Tips to Get Past Weight Loss Plateau Point In Your Diet/Exercise Program To Help Achieve Your Goals

June 21, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=Cy7XUnZHtlE%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Hi everybody, in this video I give you helpful diet and exercise tips to get over the dreaded plateau when your body just doesn’t seem to want to lose more weight. This can be a difficult time for people who have been steadily losing weight and then stop seeing the scale move lower. It’s a point where people tend to give up and start gaining weight again because they feel they will never reach their goal weight loss. Well, this video is about conquering this situation head on and giving your body a little push to get you over the hump. Ihope you found this video helpful. Please subscribe because I have so much more to come; something helpful and of interest to everyone. Thanks so much for viewing! To purchase a YouTips4U custom-designed T-Shirt please click here: cgi.ebay.com To visit me at my blogspot, please click here: www.youtips4u.blogspot.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!
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Nuts and berries clean up the aging brain

August 31, 2010 by  
Filed under AGING

In Germany, there is a snack called “Studentenfutter” which can be translated into English as “students’ food”. It simply consists of different nuts, raisins and other dried fruit. There are lots of explanation as to how the snack got its name. One is that it is cheap and therefore a favourite among students on a tight budget. Another is that it is a very handy snack – packed in a little plastic bag that can fit in pockets of jeans and jackets– and is therefore ideal for on-the-go students. My favourite explanation, however, is that the snack gives the much needed extra brain power for students during the exams period.

Recent evidence from research studies indicates that there is some truth to the 3rd explanation. It seems that certain compounds found in nuts and berries may have positive effects on the brain. These compounds supposedly “activate the brain’s natural “housekeeper” mechanism that cleans up and recycles toxic proteins.” The result is the slowing down of memory loss and mental decline that comes with aging.

According to Dr. Shibu Poulose, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture Research Service’s Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (source WebMD):

“The good news is that natural compounds called polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables and nuts have an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect that may protect against age-associated decline.”

In aging brain tissue, waste products accumulate with time. Due to this build up, the brain cells that are supposed to clean up the waste become overactivated and can cause damage to healthy cells. The polyphenols in the berries, however, come to the rescue and restore normal cleaning up function. Poulose and his team of researchers demonstrated this in a study using mouse brain tissue.

Among the berries, blueberries, strawberries and acai berries are especially rich in polyphenols whereas walnuts are the champions among nuts. This is rather timely considering that it is the season for berries and nuts. The berries season is about to end and the nuts are about to fall.

However, polyphenols can also be found in other fruits and vegetables, especially those with deep red, orange, or blue pigments. Thus, even when the berries go out of season, we still have tomatoes to supply us with polyphenols the whole year round.

As to walnuts, the shelled nut closely resembles the brain, doesn’t it? At any rate, each time I see a walnut, I would remember that this nut is a good brain food and pop it into my mouth. Walnuts keep longer than berries and are available always in the supermarket.

So next time you find yourself forgetting something, maybe your brain just needs some cleaning up. And you know just what foods to eat to get the job done right.

Photo credit: wikicommons

Why going nuts can be a good thing

May 13, 2010 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

Could nuts be the natural – and delicious – alternative to statins? Researchers a Loma Linda University in California report that nuts can effectively lower total and LDL cholesterols, improve LDL to HDL cholesterol ration and overall lipid profile.

According to lead researcher Dr Joan Sabaté:

“Our findings confirm the results of epidemiological studies showing that nut consumption lowers coronary heart disease risk and support the inclusion of nuts in therapeutic dietary interventions for improving blood lipid levels and lipoproteins and for lowering coronary heart disease risk.”

The authors performed a meta-analysis of studies that evaluated  effect of nut consumption on blood lipid levels in different populations with different diets and BMI.

But which nuts are good anti-cholesterol agents?

The analysis looked at studies on various types of nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pistachios, macadamias, almonds, and pecans. Results showed that all these nuts, and many other types  are effective. The US FDA recommends  the following nuts in preventing heart disease:

  • hazelnuts
  • pecans
  • pistachios
  • walnuts
  • peanuts

How much nuts do we have to consume to lower out cholesterol?

Nut consumption in the studies analyzed ranged from 23 to 132 grams (average is 67 grams). Data analysis showed that the cholesterol-lowering effect of nuts seems to be dose-related, meaning the more nuts you eat, the more your lipid levels improve. And effects are most evident among those with high LDL cholesterol and those with lower BMI but did not vary between male and female study participants. A consumption of 67 grams of nuts per day reduced total cholesterol levels by 10.9 mg/dL and LDL cholesterol by 10.2 mg/dL, respectively. However, nuts do not seem to have a significant effect on triglycerides.

Nuts are rich in antioxidants such as flavonoids and phytosterols. According to Nuthealth.org:

Flavonoids—a class of water-soluble plant pigments, some of the best-known are genistein in soy and quercetin in onions; and

Phytosterols—including plant sterols and plant stanols. Plant sterols are naturally occurring substances present in the diet as minor components of vegetable oils. Plant stanols, occurring in nature at a lower level, are hydrogenation compounds of the respective plant sterols.

To find out the nutritional facts of your favorite tree nuts (almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts), check out Nuthealth.org.

Photo credit: nuthealth.org

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.