Weight loss & Health 1of2. Plus Size Chic Fashion Tips and Tricks Episode 10 Fat and Fabulous

June 30, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=ulvkejqHcZs%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Link to my Fat & Fabulous Blog, so much more! www.fatandfabulousfashion.com Follow me on Twitter! @FatandFabulous1 My Vintage Fashion Blog! hautehippiebucketlife.blogspot.com Tumblr OOTD: fatandfabulousfashion.tumblr.com Fat & Fabulous, is within the Plus Size community, advocating awareness,tolerance, and acceptance. Plus Size Fashion & News Channel. Spreading the good word on why we should embrace ourselves, and how! This Episode: The 10th episode of a series I am doing on fashion forward tips and tricks for fashonista plus size women! This episode is Part 1 of 4, and includes weight loss tips, tricks, and tools to get true results, the healthy gimick free way! Enjoy, please leave comments and questions, and check back for many more episodes to come!

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!
credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

What’s the latest in health care, September 21

September 21, 2009 by  
Filed under HEALTHCARE

world_stetWhat’s new in drug approval?

FDA Approves Vaccines for 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus 
The US FDA announced last week the approval of vaccines against the H1N1 flu virus. The Vaccines were manufactured by 4 pharma companies CSL Limited, MedImmune LLC, Novartis Vaccines, and Diagnostics Limited. According to FDA commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg

“Today’s approval is good news for our nation’s response to the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. This vaccine will help protect individuals from serious illness and death from influenza.”

FDA Approves Donor Screening Test for Antibodies to HIV
Also approved by the FDA last week was a screening tool designed to detect the presence of certain antibodies to HIV. The tool is to be used to screen donated blood and blood specimens for HIV type 1.

What’s new on the web?

CDC Updates and Expands Social Media Tools Site
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stepped up its use of social media tools to reach more people. Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, YouTube, Flickr, Second Life, you name it, CDC has it. The newly released site highlights several social media campaigns, provides information on all of the social media tools CDC uses, and showcases social media data and metrics. The site also equips partners and the public with a unified, easily accessible space to find information on CDC social media efforts and assists communicators in their planning, strategy, and evaluation.

HHS and USDA Unveil New Food Safety Consumer Web Site at www.foodsafety.gov
On September 9, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack introduced to the public a new consumer web site at www.foodsafety.gov “designed to help consumers and families get all the latest information on food safety and food recalls in one convenient place.”

What’s new in safety?

National Child Passenger Safety Week: Keep your most precious cargo safe.
Last week, September 12–18 was National Child Passenger Safety Week in the US. According to the CDC, about 4 children ages 14 or younger were killed in motor vehicle crashes every day in 2008, and many more were injured. The CDC site gives us a list of ways to maximize security and reduce the risk.

Letter to Industry on Cigarettes Containing Certain Characterizing Flavors

The US FDA wrote a letter last week reminding the tobacco industry that effective Tuesday, September 22, 2009, cigarettes that contain certain characterizing flavors are considered adulterated under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA or the Act), as amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA).

Update on the swine/Mexican flu epidemic

April 30, 2009 by  
Filed under HEALTHCARE

The pandemic alert level of 5 out of a 6-point scale has been declared by the World Health Organization with regards to the swine or Mexican flu. The flu which was originally reported in Mexico has spread in the North American continent to infect people in the United States (91) and Canada (13). The first fatal case in the US was reported on Wednesday, 29 April in Texas.

In Europe and the rest of the world, the following confirmed cases have been reported on 30 April 2009, 08:00 CEST.

  • Austria (1)
  • Costa Rica (2)
  • Germany (3)
  • Israel (2)
  • New Zealand (14)
  • Peru (1)
  • Spain (10)
  • United Kingdom (5)

As of noon today, 30 April 2009, Switzerland announced its first confirmed case.

The rapidity of how the virus “jumped” continents is largely attributed to the ease of global travel nowadays. Almost all confirmed cases outside North America have been in Mexico recently.

It is very easy to get confused about all the reports coming different sectors, be it from the media, from health authorities to conspiracy theorists.

To keep yourself updated, check put the following recommended sites:

The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC). The CDC has done/is doing the following:

  • implemented its emergency response and released part of its stockpile of medications for use.
  • issued new interim guidance for doctors on how to care for children and pregnant women who might get infected.
  • gives regular updates

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is issuing updates for Europe.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has done/is doing the following:

  • coordinates with health officials of different countries to facilitate reporting and monitoring
  • issues alerts and updates

Some useful and practical info to prepare yourself (aside from what the aforementioned sites can give you) can be found at WedMD:

The most important survival tip of all: be alert but do not panic!

Photo credit: stock. xchng

Related Posts with Thumbnails

NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.