Stress and Alcohol

August 26, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

‘She drove me to drink’ used to be a popular phrase. Its essential meaning is that stress induces people to consume alcohol. While it’s true that stress can be an incentive to drink, it’s equally true that heavy alcohol consumption causes stress.

Moderate alcohol intake, to be sure, can have beneficial effects. Research suggests that small amounts can even improve mental functioning and increase performance in problem solving while stressed. But, there are also studies that demonstrate that large quantities, particularly when consumed for long periods, actually worsens stress.

Large alcohol consumption stimulates the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands. One result is an increase in the amount of cortisol produced within the body. Another is an increase in adrenaline. Both those, while they don’t alone cause stress, play a large role in the symptoms.

Extreme stress makes it more difficult to concentrate. One of the obvious effects of high alcohol intake is to produce that exact effect. Thus, heavy drinkers get a double whammy just at the moment they need mental clarity most.

Other studies suggest that chronic drinkers have symptoms similar to those seen in children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). Children of those drinkers, this research concludes, have a higher incidence of actual ADHD.

So, it may also be true that as much as the stress of parenting may lead to drinking, adult drinking may encourage the circumstances that incent the parent to drink. It may be a factor in producing children’s symptoms that lead to adult stress.

Exercise is known to help relieve the symptoms of stress. Unfortunately, one of the additional results of excessive alcohol consumption is decreased exercise. Few inebriated people want to go a few rounds on the weight machine.

Similarly, high alcohol intake suppresses appetite. Thus, at the same time alcoholic drinks pour in the calories, they decrease the incentive to maintain a healthy diet. Once again the drinker experiences a doubly negative reinforcing effect.

Those who drink excessively to escape stress motivated by money concerns find it more difficult to cope with the problem that caused the stress in the first place. Even simple tasks like balancing a checkbook are clearly more difficult when drunk. But beyond such minor details, the cognitive functions needed to develop long term strategies are impaired. Drinkers literally can’t think their way out of the problems causing the stress.

In all these cases there is a vicious cycle established. Stress encourages heavy drinking, which makes it more difficult to deal with the internal and external factors that led to stress in the first place. Though the specific numbers will vary from person to person, when the average individual drinks more than the equivalent of two or three shots of whiskey per day, the results are inevitably bad.

The key to breaking this vicious cycle is to seek alternative methods for dealing with stress. Both the symptoms and the underlying motivators are subject to change in almost all cases. Proper exercise and diet is a good beginning. A realistic attitude about life’s inherent challenges can go a long way, as well. But, as with any psychological problem, admitting it exists is the first necessary step.

Curing Stress – Techniques

August 24, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

No doubt it’s impractical to try to ‘cure’ stress in the sense of eliminating all occurrences. But there are several practical short-term and effective long-term strategies for minimizing it and its effects.

Most individuals under stress will let it build, ignoring it for too long. They cite the need to get a work project completed, or view their situation as unchangeable. “That’s life,” many will say. But no form of ill-effect is inevitable, nor is it necessary or wise to passively accept one.

The first step is always to increase awareness in two directions – outward and inward. Be conscious of your internal state and evaluate it as realistically as possible. Be objective about external circumstances. When you recognize a circumstance as legitimately worrisome, reacting with concern and a degree of stress is normal and healthy. Unreasonable fear and obsession are not.

Then, take a moment to breath – literally. One of the most common reactions to stress is tension, usually muscle tension. The neck muscles will stiffen and breathing will often be more shallow. Focus on this, check for it and, if present, consciously loosen up neck muscles with a gentle side to side motion of your head. Take a deep breath or two.

There’s no need to overdo the exercise. You’re not practicing yoga and you don’t want to hyperventilate. Slowly move the head and shoulders and relax the chest muscles. A slow deep breath or two is often enough to break the tension.

But those suggestions are effective primarily for acute stress – the type that is produced by an isolated event and lasts a short time. For chronic stress – that which results from ongoing circumstances and evaluations and persists – additional techniques are needed.

Something as simple and old-fashioned as a walk in the park can be helpful. It’s not simply an old wives tale that fresh air and sunshine can be relaxing. It’s also true that moderate exercise helps relieve many of the accompanying physical symptoms of stress.

Playing music of certain types is helpful. Seeing a comedy on TV or at the movies is beneficial. Laughter is a great mood lifter. A creative activity can be helpful, especially if there is some accompanying physical activity. It could be as simple as making a birdhouse or as advanced as painting or sculpture.

A talk with a sympathetic friend could be useful, but it’s a good idea not to spend too much time talking about the circumstances causing stress or the stress itself. A good airing is beneficial, but too many times it’s an excuse to obsess over the problem. Some people are too much inclined to seek out only those who will reinforce negative evaluations.

Just keep in mind that these are all techniques to help relieve symptoms, they don’t address the underlying causes. As such, they are only one (albeit important) component in curing stress. For that, more in-depth action is needed.

Pushing Back the Furniture to Dance

May 11, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Kelly Swanson

Every summer we used to meet over at Mee Maw and Paw Paw’s house on the pond for a family reunion after church – same Sunday every year. And you’d show up bringing your latest addition, or attachment, philosophy on life, lingering grudge, or the dish you were known for making, like Aunt Bitsy’s congealed salad surprise which just goes to show that surprises aren’t always a good thing.

And somewhere after dinner or supper or lunch – whatever you like to call it depending on where you are from – we’d all collapse anywhere we could find a spot inside to avoid the heat and commence to staring at each other and just talking. And somewhere out of the tranquil boredom of that Sunday afternoon a bud of an argument would sprout – usually over politics or religion or Cousin Enid’s latest experimentations with the darker side of life – something that tends to happen when you put folks together that are bonded by blood instead of choice.

And just when things would get heated to the point where you were sure it would come to blows or that Mee Maw’s heart would give out once and for all, Uncle Skeet would pull out his guitar and quietly start to pick. Sometimes it was a little Hank, sometimes a little Willie, and sometimes one of those good old Gospel bluegrass favorites of my childhood. And quietly underneath the tension the tune would float through the air. Some bright morning when this life is over. I’ll fly away. And someone would start to hum. Another would tap his foot. Eyes would close. To that home on God’s celestial shore. I’ll fly away. And as the tune picked up in speed, without prodding, some folks would get up and push back the furniture. And we’d start to dance. Hand in hand. I’ll fly away oh glory, I’ll fly away. And in that one moment the rest of the world grew blurry. In that moment we forget about our differences. We remembered what brought us together. In that moment it was about the music. And we’d dance.

Our lives are filled with stress – especially in the workplace. How often do you take the time to push back the furniture and dance?

Kelly Swanson It’s all fun and games ’til the hair gets messed up www.kellyswanson.net kelly@kellyswanson.net

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kelly_Swanson

AHHH – I’m All Stressed Out

April 5, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Rebecca Osborn

What is stress? Stress is a feeling experienced when a person perceives that the demand placed on them is greater than what they can give.

Particularly in normal working life, much of our stress is subtle and occurs without obvious threat to survival. Most comes from things like work overload, conflicting priorities, inconsistent values, over-challenging deadlines, conflict with co-workers, unpleasant environments and so on. Not only do these reduce our performance as we divert mental effort into handling them, they can also cause a great deal of unhappiness.

Listed here are ways you can relieve stress in your life and work towards stress free day!

1. Get a good night sleep. If you are not sleeping properly, have disturbed sleep or get only a few hours each night, your concentration will decrease and you will be less effective at work. Make sure you get a good night’s sleep.

2. When did you last have a holiday? Think about when you last went on vacation. If this was a long time ago, you may be feeling run down or over-stretched. Book a relaxing vacation somewhere nice. If you cannot afford to go away, book a day or two off work and commit them to relaxing at home! Run the bath, get a book, make no appointments. Just relax!

3. Are your environments stress free? Assess your living and working environments. It may not be something you can immediately change, but you can work towards it. If your working environment or commute is unpleasant, consider moving job or home.

4. Party. Make sure that you make time to socialize with your friends and co-workers. All work and no play is not healthy!

5. Seek counsel. List the stresses that you are currently experiencing. If there are stresses that seem particularly overwhelming, ask yourself if you need help in dealing with them. If appropriate, seek out a counsellor.

6. Exercise. If you are not exercising regularly, then get a medical check up and start. Join a gym, sports club or something similar. Find a sport or fitness regime that you enjoy, and get into the habit of exercising regularly.

Is there greatness on the inside of you but you don’t know how to achieve it? Jason has just completed his brand new 7 part e-course, ‘Find Your Greatness’

Get it free when you subscribe at: Find Your Greatness

Jason and Rebecca Osborn have dedicated themselves to changing thousands of lives by helping people find their greatness and true potential through their Find Your Greatness Newsletter.

Also log onto livingword.ie for more inspirational messages.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rebecca_Osborn

Do You Need A Quick Stress Release?

March 17, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

Stress Related Games Added To This Site

I’ve added the code for two games from the MiniClips site .. which you can access by clicking the button on the top menu. These games are flash games and usually work on most PC’s running windows .. but if you are experiencing problems you might want to check out their requirements page.

A Day Of Slacking (Game)

Paint Ball (Game)

Enjoy.

Meditation for Reducing Stress

February 12, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Richard Pettinger

Meditation is an ancient tradition which enables the practitioner to reduce stress and increase his-her sense of inner well being. Meditation works by reducing our attachment to our thoughts. By being able to switch off from our daily activities and thoughts we can reduce our stress levels and over time experience a sense of inner peace.

Stress occurs because we have many pressures on our time. These demands can come from; work, family, friends and financial pressures. We get stressed because we feel it is difficult to cope. As a consequence we can spend a lot of time thinking about our problems. However thinking about the magnitude and scale of our problems doesn’t help us to reduce our stress levels. In fact thinking can make the situation worse. We just feel confused and helpless about our myriad problems.

Meditation can help Reduce Stress in various ways.

1. In Meditation we make a concerted effort to remain only in the present instance. In meditation we are not thinking about the past or the future.

2. Meditation teaches us to control and reduce our thoughts. When we live in the mind and are constantly thinking, it is impossible to have real peace of mind. However through meditation we can elevate our consciousness beyond the realm of the thinking mind. By meditating on our heart we feel that we are not the slave of our thoughts.

3. Meditation with meditative music can be a very effective way of reducing our feelings of stress and worry. Meditative music embodies the qualities of meditation and inner peace. When we listen to the right kind of meditative music it is much easier to dive deep within and forget the problems of the world.

4. Meditation and Breathing. A significant aspect of meditation is that we focus very carefully on our breathing. We allow our breathing to become soft, natural and rhythmic. By focusing on our breath we can have very good meditation. Our breathing is very important for affecting our levels of stress. When our breathing slows down it helps the mind to calm down; our worries and anxieties soon leave.

Meditation can definitely help us to reduce our levels of stress. However to get the most benefit we need to practise regularly. If at first it seems difficult to control our thoughts, we need to persevere. We can also try meditating with music for meditation. Through repeated practise we can discover the very important art of reconnecting with our inner self. When we can do this stress will significantly reduce.

View: Music for Meditation and Relaxation

Richard is a meditation student of Sri Chinmoy. He contributes some articles to Radio Sri Chinmoy. www.radiosrichinmoy.org

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Pettinger

10 Tips For Dealing With Stress

January 31, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Donald Saunders

Feelings of stress are part and parcel of everyday life and in many situations stress can actually be good for us. In emergencies for example stress is nothing more than the body’s instinctive reaction to defend itself. It is stress therefore that would cause us to jump out of the way if we saw a car hurtling towards us at high speed.

Stress however is not always a good thing and, if we find ourselves under stress for any length of time, it can start to result in physical symptoms such as headaches, back pain, shortness of breath, an upset stomach and insomnia, to name just a few. So, how can you manage stress in this sort of situation?

Here are 10 tips to help you to cope with life’s challenges.

Tip No 1. Stop worrying about things over which you have no control. There are a host of things that we worry about on a daily basis but it’s very important to distinguish between those things which we can control and those things which we can’t control. For example, it’s fine to worry about the fact that we’re getting a little bit overweight because all we have to do is to cut down on our eating or take a little bit more exercise. However, there’s little point in worrying about whether or not the weather at the weekend is going to be fine for our camping trip since we have no control over the weather.

Tip No 2. Resolve your differences with others. A great deal of the stress in our lives comes from our interaction with other people. So, if you find yourself involved in the conflict, sit down with the person involved and try to resolve your differences.

Tip No 3. Set yourself realistic goals. It’s amazing just how much stress you can generate when you try to do too much too quickly. Plan out your time carefully, both at home and at work, and set yourself challenging but attainable targets.

Tip No 4. Be prepared for stressful situations. If you know that you have an event coming up which is likely to be stressful, then sit down and think about ways in which you can either eliminate or reduce any possible stress before the event arises.

Tip No 5. Adopt a positive attitude towards change. It’s a simple fact that most of us don’t like change and tend to view it as something of a threat. In reality of course most of the changes that occur in our lives are for the good and you can eliminate or reduce stress considerably if you adopt a positive attitude towards change and focus your attention on the benefits rather than the drawbacks to changes in your life.

Tip No 6. Add variety into your life. Life can become very stressful if it simply alternates between home and work and it’s important to add variety wherever possible. Whether you enjoy sports, have a favorite hobby or like social events, there are always at least two or three things that you can find to do on a regular basis which take you away from your home and work environments and allow you to relax, unwind and, if you want to, to meet other people.

Tip No 7. Have an exercise routine. As many of the symptoms of stress are physical such as headaches, back pain, insomnia and weight gain, keeping yourself reasonably fit and healthy through some sort of regular exercise routine will both help to reduce stress in itself and also make your body better able to cope with it when it does arise.

Tip No 8. Ensure that you eat and sleep properly. Rather like exercise, it’s also important to keep yourself in shape by ensuring that you keep to well-balanced diet and that you get enough sleep.

Tip No 9. Take up meditation. The power of meditation has been well understood for thousands of years and it is an excellent way to deal with the stresses and strains of life. Try to set aside a little bit of time each day when you can sit quietly by yourself, put time on hold briefly, and clear your mind before moving on with the day’s chores.

Tip No 10. Don’t be afraid to talk to your family, trusty friends or a counselor. It may be a cliché to say that a problem shared is a problem halved, but there is wisdom in this old saying. If things start to pile up on you then sit down and share your worries with somebody else. Not only will this help to ease your problem in itself, but they may well be able to ease your mind further with good advice and by perhaps helping you to put things into perspective or to see things from a different angle.

The vast majority on the negative stress that we will encounter in our daily lives is either avoidable or can certainly be reduced considerably. The secret lies in recognizing the dangers of stress and taking action before it starts to affect you.

For more information about stress, including such things as stress symptoms and stress relief, please visit Stress-Relief-And-Anxiety-Relievers.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donald_Saunders

5 Steps To Reduce Stress Naturally

January 15, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Chris Green

Feeling as if you’re trapped in a rut or that your life is going nowhere is another part of stressful illnesses and this feeling can trigger depression. Doing the same routines day in, day out isn’t good for us and although we do need some security, too much can cause problems. Take yourself out of your comfort zone and try something new. Start a course, a fitness program, try a new sport, learn a musical instrument, go on a activity holiday or take up a new hobby. New experiences add to the pleasure you get from life and keep your spark alive.

Avoid stress, anxiety and depression treatments that don’t work, especially diets, nutritional supplements and antidepressant drugs. The food you eat or don’t eat cannot cause nor cure stress, depression or anxiety. Drugs are used to treat chemical imbalances and as yet, there is no scientific evidence anywhere to prove that chemical imbalances cause stress, depression or anxiety. One of the main causes for all of them lies in flawed modes of thinking and these can be very effectively addressed and will bring more relief for you than food, supplements or drugs.

When you’re suffering a stressful, depressive or anxious episode, a feeling that somehow, it’s your fault can creep in. In blaming yourself this way, guilty feelings arise and you feel even worse. But you’re not at fault in anyway, you didn’t suddenly decide to suffer from stress, depression or anxiety and I know you’d ditch them right now if you could! Stress, depression and anxiety have specific causes that certainly aren’t your fault. Never blame yourself and concentrate on treating the causes instead.

Burnout is an ever increasing problem in our society. As if a full working day isn’t enough, many people return home and have to do even more work to run the family home, prepare meals, time for the children and a multitude of other activities and people all clamouring for attention. So make “me time” a priority. Have at least one 20 minute break away from your work station where you can relax in peace. At home, schedule periods each day so you can rest and relax. These times are so important to both mental and physical health and they’ll help relieve stress, depression and anxiety.

It’s been said many times: What you focus on becomes your reality. It’s true and in life, little things can make a big difference. If you continually focus on problems, on little things that annoy you, on the irritating habits your loved ones have and on all of the inconveniences we all experience in daily living, your going to be unhappy. Instead, focus on the little things that make life worthwhile but that many of us take for granted: a sunrise, a smile, an act of kindness, a star filled sky, a hug from your children, a kiss from your lover or support from your friends and family. We all have many wonderful things we can focus on everyday instead of expecting them without regard and the more you focus on these little things, the happier you’ll feel.

Each of the above techniques will help you reduce stress and improve your overall health as well. Use them every day and you’ll quickly feel the stress melting away.

Put all 5 of these natural stress relief tips into practice and feel your mood levels soar!

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chris_Green

Liz Strauss and Stress Management

December 5, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

Stress Relief

November 29, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Edward Group

Traffic jams. Toddler tantrums. Deadlines at work. Money troubles. Too much work. Not enough sleep. No time to eat right or even to think.

Does this sound familiar? Stress is all around us. It’s an inevitable and normal part of our daily lives. But over time, its effects can be quite taxing. Stress becomes a problem when you feel overwhelmed by its challenges. And though it may be difficult to define, that doesn’t mean it’s all in your head. Researchers have found that there are significant biological changes that take place in the body in times of stress. And extended periods of stress can cause destructive changes in the body such as depression and a suppressed immune system, which can lead to heart disease, cancer, and stroke. So if you are feeling stressed out, its time to get some relief. Learn about stress: how to identify it, and how to find relief.

Why Do We Get Stressed?

Stress is a normal physical reaction to an internal or external pressure that is placed on your system. People react to most stressful situations with the “fight or flight” response. The body is flooded with stress hormones, making the heart pump faster, the breathing rate increase, and the muscles tense up. This is the body’s way of gearing up for imminent physical activity. For instance, if you are in a minor car accident, your may feel a surge of energy that allows you to escape the car and help others out as well. However, sometimes the stress is emotional rather than physical and the body is not allowed to release the physical tension created by stress hormones. If you’re stuck in a traffic jam and late for a meeting, there is little that you can safely do to release the buildup of stress hormones in your body. Over time, stress can lead to back pain, headaches, raised blood pressure, indigestion, sweating, palpitations, irritability, and anxiety. It can also contribute to the development of such diseases as cold sores, ulcers, and heart disease.

What Causes Our Stress?

There are two types of stressors that may be causing you grief. External stressors such as traffic jams, a death in the family, or a financial hardship, are often out of our direct control. Internal stressors, on the other hand, develop through our own personality traits and emotions. It is our ability to handle these internal and external stressors that determines the amount of stress we feel we have. Chemical substances such as alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, sugar, additives, drugs, and environmental toxins, deplete the body of energy and are further sources of stress.

How Can We Prevent Stress?

Stress is an inevitable and normal part of life. So there is no way to prevent it completely. However, there are various stress management techniques that can reduce the effects that stress takes on your life. The most important thing you can do to prevent stress from negatively affecting you is to learn how to recognize stress and the triggers that set you off. Also, avoiding substances such as alcohol, drugs, and nicotine will help the body remain better prepared to handle stress.

Am I Stressed Out?

Ask yourself the following questions:

1. Are you a “control freak,” insisting that everything be done your way?

2. Do you have difficulty sleeping at night, because you are going over the events of the day, or worrying about what will happen tomorrow?

3. Do you have a hard time showing your emotions?

4. Do you feel overwhelmed by the number of tasks that you need to accomplish on a daily basis?

Being able to identify your personal physical and psychological responses to stress is critical to reducing its negative effects on your life. If you try to deny the existence of stress, or “tough it out” in hopes that it will go away, you will be more likely to intensify the effects of stress rather than relieve them.

The physical symptoms of stress include dry mouth and throat; tight muscles in the neck, shoulders, and back; chronic neck and back problems; headaches; indigestion; tremors; muscle tics; insomnia; and fatigue. Emotional symptoms include difficulty in concentrating, feeling tense, irritability, impulsive behavior, difficulty in making a decision, poor judgment, difficulty relating to–and mistrusting–people, negative thinking, brooding, worrying, depression, anxiety, or feelings of worthless.

Tobacco, alcohol, and drug use can also be signs of stress.

Stress Relief Now that you can recognize the triggers that are making you stressed, you will be better prepared for dealing with these situations. Try these techniques for relieving stress before it becomes a problem.

Get Physical: Physical exercise, whether its yoga, football, walking, or dance therapy, can help to relive the buildup of stress hormones in the body and promote a general relaxation of the nervous system.

It’s All In Your Mind: Use mental exercises such as meditation, guided imagery, art, and playing music, as a useful way to reduce stress and promote relaxation in your life.

Get Connected: Sometimes, all it takes to relieve stress in your life is to talk about the stressor with a close friend or family member. Pet therapy has also been reported to relieve stress.

Eat Up and Eat Well: Stress suppresses the immune system and can cause or aggravate such conditions as heart disease and ulcers. Dietary changes, such as reducing coffee and other caffeinated beverages can reduce the jitteriness, restlessness, anxiety, and insomnia that might magnify the effects of stress.

Also whole grains promote production of the brain neurotransmitter serotonin for a greater sense of well being.

For more information on Dr. Group, stress, depression and/or anxiety please visit our website at www.stress-anxiety-depression.org.

Dr. Group, the founder/CEO and clinical director for the Global Healing Center, heads a research and development team producing advanced, new, natural health protocols and products. To learn more visit www.ghchealth.com.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Edward_Group

Relieving Stress with Exercise… and Losing Body Fat in the Process!

August 15, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Jamie Clark

Feeling stressed out lately? Don’t worry, there is a simple and incredibly effective solution — one that will help you lose weight in more ways than you might think!

Relieving Stress with Exercise

Research has proven that relieving stress with exercise is one of the best ways to improve your overall health. Regular exercise provides an amazing array of anti-stress benefits to the human body — including reduced muscle tension, improved cardiovascular functioning, increased blood oxygen levels, and reduced cholesterol and triglyceride levels, just to name a few.

Relieving stress with exercise also, of course, burns calories and helps to reduce body fat. Since most other anti-stress ‘remedies’ (especially pharmaceutical drugs, alcohol, and overeating) cause you to gain weight it’s obvious that exercise is the best option.

Control Cortisol, Lose Weight

But, besides burning calories, there’s another reason relieving stress with exercise helps you to reduce body fat. Exercise produces chemicals that help to lower cortisol production. Cortisol is a “stress hormone” that has gotten a lot of press lately because many new diet products claim to block it.

While the effectiveness of these products has yet to be proven, there is little doubt that controlling cortisol levels is a very important factor in weight loss and long-term weight control — not to mention optimal health and fitness. Relieving stress with exercise is an absolutely fool-proof way to lower cortisol in the body.

Elevated cortisol levels are fully or partially responsible for everything from sugar and carb cravings to overeating to low energy levels… and more. Experts also believe that high cortisol production increases the amount of “toxic fat” stored on your body — this is the abdominal fat that may trigger cardiovascular disease and inflammation-related health problems.

Summary

Relieving stress with exercise is, without a doubt, the best way to deal with your physical and mental tension. Not only will regular exercise reduce stress levels, it will also help you control how much cortisol your body produces. This, in turn, will help you to avoid food cravings, reduce dangerous abdominal fat, and basically feel much better. So, next time you feel stressed out, get up, get out, and start relieving stress with exercise!

About The Author

Jamie Clark is a fitness writer and editor of the popular ‘Really Useful Fitness Blog’ located at: www.fitfaq.com/blog.html

Please feel free to use this article in your newsletter or on your web site. Just be sure to include this resource box as well as a live link to the fitFAQ.com Fitness Guide: www.fitfaq.com

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Nature Wallpapers – Best Stress Busters

June 12, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

By CD Mohatta

All city dwellers miss the enchanting nature. The waterfalls, the rivers, the lovely flower fields, the mountain ranges, these all are a treat for the tired eyes. After we go to nature, we feel very peaceful and calm. Our disturbances of mind slow down. Today, most of the stressed workers are looking for anti stress treatments. What can be a better stress buster than nature?

How Nature wallpapers are great stress busters – Our eyes, ears, touch and other senses directly affect our mood. When we view a lovely sight, our mind becomes positive and the state of the mind changes. Try this experiment. Watch some very dirty sight and note the state of your mind. Now watch a beautiful sight and note the change in your state. You will find a sudden change for the better. Nature wallpapers can help us bring these changes fast.

Nature Wallpapers are full of variety- you will get a huge variety in nature wallpapers. You will get scenes of beaches, clouds, countryside, deserts, flowers, lakes & seas, landscapes, mountains, panoramas, plants & trees, rivers & streams, sunsets, and waterfalls. In each of these topics, you will get to choose from dozens of wallpapers. Imagine of the variety available?

Sizes – You will get free nature wallpapers in sizes suitable for most of the monitor sizes. Download one that fits your monitor.

Cost – Some websites offer free nature wallpapers while most of the websites charge money. Select from free websites. You will get a great collection free.

Precautions while downloading – Avoid adware and spyware. Don’t download exe. files. Download lightweight wallpapers and enjoy. Nature wallpapers area lovely sight to watch. You can also send your selection to your friends and family. Enjoy with these free downloads.

CD Mohatta writes text for Free Desktop wallpapers. You can download as many as you wish at no cost. They are all free for you. Please select from – Free Nature Wallpapers from www.screene.com/ You can also try more than three hundred tests and fun quizzes free on www.funquizcards.com/

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=CD_Mohatta

The Best Stress Relief and It’s Free!

June 12, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Vicki Miller

“Let your mind be quiet, realizing the beauty of the world, and the immense, the boundless treasures that it holds in store.” by Edward Carpenter

The Best Stress Relief and It’s Free!

Sometimes it’s the simple things that are the most moving. I love to watch sunsets whenever possible, especially after a busy day. One evening, after a particularly hectic day, I observed one of the most beautiful sunsets ever. As the sun went below the horizon, the skies turned various shades of pink across an unusual cloud formation. As far as I could see, the sky was ablaze with color. I was in awe. I was mesmerized and so moved that I begin to silently say thank you for the opportunity to view such beauty. I felt such peace and serenity that I wanted it to last forever. And guess what? This pure pleasure was free!!

When I was sitting on the deck, I wondered how many people were also watching this spectacular sunset. When was the last time you enjoyed such simple pleasures as watching the sun rise or set? Nature offers beautiful things for us to see everyday, but most of the time we are too busy to even notice. What would it take for you to add one simple pleasure to your daily routine? Would it mean turning off the TV for a short while, pulling yourself away from the computer, or working one hour less? Think about being out in nature. What brings you joy? Is it seeing a rainbow after a storm, planting flowers, bird watching, sitting by a body of water, listening to a waterfall, being the first person on the golf course early morning, walking your dog or watching the sun rise or set?

Think back to some of the pleasant memories in your life. How many of them have something to do with nature? As writer Wayne Dyer says: “It is not an accident that so many of our most revered poets and writers have found nature to be the source of their artistry. It is in nature that one loses all judgments and false pretenses because nature does not judge.”

For one week, pick a designated time each day to immerse yourself in nature. Just listen and observe, even if it’s only for 20 minutes. Pay attention to how you feel at the end of the week. Energized? Serene? Rested? Commit to making this simple pleasure a part of your daily routine and give yourself the best stress relief – and it’s absolutely free!

Copyright June 2004 by Vicki Miller

As a Life Transition Coach I work with clients to identify what’s most important to them and prioritize around these values. I help my clients identify and remove obstacles in the way and bring clarity and focus to their dreams. What is your dream? Are you undergoing a major transition and not clear where to turn? Call (972-306-4489) or email me, (coach.v.miller@verizon.net), to set up a complimentary, no obligation 30 minute coaching session. Download my FREE e-Book, 12 Fun Ways to Change Your Life, or sign up for my FREE monthly newsletter at www.thrivingthroughchange.com

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Relieving Stress with Exercise… and Losing Body Fat in the Process!

May 8, 2006 by  
Filed under STRESS

By Jamie Clark

Feeling stressed out lately? Don’t worry, there is a simple and incredibly effective solution — one that will help you lose weight in more ways than you might think!

Relieving Stress with Exercise

Research has proven that relieving stress with exercise is one of the best ways to improve your overall health. Regular exercise provides an amazing array of anti-stress benefits to the human body — including reduced muscle tension, improved cardiovascular functioning, increased blood oxygen levels, and reduced cholesterol and triglyceride levels, just to name a few.

Relieving stress with exercise also, of course, burns calories and helps to reduce body fat. Since most other anti-stress ‘remedies’ (especially pharmaceutical drugs, alcohol, and overeating) cause you to gain weight it’s obvious that exercise is the best option.

Control Cortisol, Lose Weight

But, besides burning calories, there’s another reason relieving stress with exercise helps you to reduce body fat. Exercise produces chemicals that help to lower cortisol production. Cortisol is a “stress hormone” that has gotten a lot of press lately because many new diet products claim to block it.

While the effectiveness of these products has yet to be proven, there is little doubt that controlling cortisol levels is a very important factor in weight loss and long-term weight control — not to mention optimal health and fitness. Relieving stress with exercise is an absolutely fool-proof way to lower cortisol in the body.

Elevated cortisol levels are fully or partially responsible for everything from sugar and carb cravings to overeating to low energy levels… and more. Experts also believe that high cortisol production increases the amount of “toxic fat” stored on your body — this is the abdominal fat that may trigger cardiovascular disease and inflammation-related health problems.

Summary

Relieving stress with exercise is, without a doubt, the best way to deal with your physical and mental tension. Not only will regular exercise reduce stress levels, it will also help you control how much cortisol your body produces. This, in turn, will help you to avoid food cravings, reduce dangerous abdominal fat, and basically feel much better. So, next time you feel stressed out, get up, get out, and start relieving stress with exercise!

About The Author

Jamie Clark is a fitness writer and editor of the popular ‘Really Useful Fitness Blog’ located at: www.fitfaq.com/blog.html

Please feel free to use this article in your newsletter or on your web site. Just be sure to include this resource box as well as a live link to the fitFAQ.com Fitness Guide: www.fitfaq.com

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.