Dating Secrets for Women: How Good Is Your Kissing?

July 11, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

The Wing Girls – Online Dating Tips

July 3, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=Z5P4qU8G3XY%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Is your online profile just not cutting it? The Wing Girls give you some ways to make your profile just as hot as you are! The Wing Girls is a weekly dating advice show for guys. Hosts Jet and Star give their opinions and how-to advice about relationships, sex, kissing, dating, and everything every guy wants to know about girls. New episodes every Wednesday. www.thewinggirls.com http ADD US ON FACEBOOK

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

The Wing Girls – Dating Advice: How To Flirt

July 2, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=4nbgakvJPSk%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Yes, it’s true. Guys flirt too! Here’s how to let that girl know that you like her without having to have that awkward “I like you” talk. These are general flirting tips. To see flirting for specific situations, watch “Flirting Tips”. The Wing Girls is a weekly dating advice show for guys. Hosts Jet and Star give their opinions and how-to advice about relationships, sex, kissing, dating, and everything every guy wants to know about girls. New episodes every Wednesday. www.thewinggirls.com http ADD US ON FACEBOOK

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Relationship Advice for Women: Getting Through A Break-Up

June 21, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=H5aAOXyxtfQ%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Well, did you like the video? Want .00, no catch and nothing to buy? Go Here! tinyurl.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Dating: Asian Men and American Asian!

May 28, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=revQwXUPi2k%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Well, did you like the video? Want .00, no catch and nothing to buy? Go Here! tinyurl.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Sexuality Tips & Facts : Does Estrogen Make a Man Act More Feminine?

May 21, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=6DLnn9Yi0Wk%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Estrogen can make a man act more feminine if he is taking estrogen supplements for a particular reason, as men do produce a small amount of estrogen naturally in the body. Understand how men are affected by estrogen with advice from a human sexuality counselor in this free video on sexual health. Expert: Carol L. Clark Contact: www.drcarolclark.com Bio: Dr. Carol L. Clark has a Ph.D. in human sexuality, and she works with a variety of individuals, couples and groups with a wide variety of concerns. Filmmaker: Paul Muller

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Zoosk Interview: Online Dating Expert Julie Spira

May 19, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=7W1T4uwjQ5U%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Online dating expert and Huffington Post columnist Julie Spira chats with Zoosk about online dating. Topics include: effective flirting, texting etiquette, keeping love in perspective, and how to break the ice. www.Zoosk.com Interview written and directed by: Juliette Tang Footage shot and edited by: Gairo Cuevas Music composed by: Scott Pickering (licensed) About Julie Spira: Julie is a worldwide authority in online dating. Her expert dating advice has appeared in numerous media outlets including The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, ABC News, CBS News, FOX News, BBC Radio, Cosmo Radio, Cyberguy, E! Entertainment, Glamour.com, Mens Health, and the Huffington Post. She was named one of the Top 10 Columnists to follow on Twitter.

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Ask Asian Men: Asian Girls Dating White Men Part 1

April 27, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Well, did you like the video? Want .00, no catch and nothing to buy? Go Here! tinyurl.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Hot Women Are Bad For Your Health (Study)

March 12, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=6M7C56zrfkM%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

New TYT Facebook Page(!): www.facebook.com Don’t forget to check out Ana’s blog at: www.examiner.com Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com TYT Network (new WTF?! channel): www.youtube.com Check Out TYT Interviews www.youtube.com Watch more at www.theyoungturks.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Dating Advice: Women Discuss Men’s Health Magazine & Jimmy The Bartender

January 7, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=LkDDepyWuY8%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Dating & relationship Advice: Female talk show hosts discuss Jimmy the bartender’s advice column in “Men’s Heath Magazine”. Is it OK for a guys girlfriend to join a men’s group of golfers on a guys day out? She doesn’t know how to golf & is slowing down the game. Susan McCord @ www.vancouverdatingrelationshipadvice.com http

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

When relationships go bad, women’s heart suffer most

March 11, 2009 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

gender_symbolsTension. Stress. Anger. Anxiety. These are what you get in a relationship gone bad. Unfortunately, the emotional distress that comes with a strained relationship can translate into physiological problems that in turn lead to conditions like high blood pressure, heart problems, and obesity.

These health problems have been reported for both men and women although the latter seems to be more susceptible to health issues caused by bad relationships, according to a study by researchers at the University of Utah.

For the study, [the researchers] recruited 276 couples married an average of two decades, in which men and women were between 40 and 70 years old. Participants filled out questionnaires that covered positives, such as emotional warmth and mutual support; and areas of tension, such as frequency of arguments and extent of disagreements over issues like sex, kids, and money. (Source: WebMD).

The participants were also monitored for blood chemistry, blood pressure and waist circumference.

The study showed that the health effects of a discordant relationship on women’s health include:

  • Depressive symptoms, more likely to be reported by women.
  • Metabolic syndrome symptoms (which would include increased blood sugar levels, increased levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides) more likely to be reported by women.
  • Weight gain and increased waist circumference, also more likely to be reported by women.
  • Depressive symptoms reported by men not related to metabolic syndrome.

This is not the first study to explore the effect of relationships on health outcomes.

A large body of research shows that divorce is associated with coronary calcification in both men and women. However, the current study clearly indicates that the relationship between emotional distress caused by a bad relationship and cardiovascular health is stronger in men than women.

In another study, researchers found out that the quality of a marriage relationship can have an influence on recovery rates of women with breast cancer.

Corollary to this, another study on stroke victims and their spouses showed that, depending on coping skills, caregiving can cause depression and put a strain on relationships.

But why are women more susceptible? According to the researchers:

Women seem to be more relationship oriented. We know by research that women tend to base their self-concept on relationships, how they are doing, how things are going for them. And we think that’s the reason we’ve shown that negative relationship issues seem to take a greater toll on women emotionally and physically.”

The Essence of Caregiving – LOVE

October 1, 2008 by  
Filed under ALZHEIMER'S

Sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees as the old saying goes, and sometimes, as caregivers, we get so wrapped up in solving problems, putting out fires, going to doctor’s appointments and dealing with legal issues like POA, etc. that we forget the real reason we became caregivers in the first place.

Because We Love

Most of us signed on as caregivers because we love our spouses, parents, grandparents or other family members and we felt like we could care for them better than anyone else. Most of us also want to keep our loved ones out of care facilities for as long as possible. Sometimes we are just kind of thrown into caregiving and sometimes there is a clear line of when it begins. Spouses, for example, just kind of slide into caregiving, whereas children or other family members tend to make more of a conscious decision to get more involved in the lives of their loved ones. Either way, it’s a decision that is made based on love and necessity.

But somewhere along the way, somewhere between determining whether or not you need an elderlaw attorney and searching for an adult day care center. Somewhere between keeping grandpa from taking of his clothes in the mall and helping grandma to put hers on we got so wrapped up in the forest of caregiving and so stressed by the isolation and overwhelming nature of it all that we forgot the tree standing right in front of us. We forget to actively and intentionally LOVE.

LOVE Your Loved One

Yes, we continue to love our parents; and our emotional response reminds us of our love as we grieve their illness, but it gets harder and harder to express our love as the illness progresses. Their favorite gifts no longer interest them. Their favorite activities have faded from memory. Even their favorite people, ie. Grandchildren, nieces, nephews, spouses and children may or may not elicit a favorable response.

Yet, we have to remember the difficult truth that, grandma or mom or dad won’t be with us always, so even though the time spent is very different, I encourage you to hold a hand, give a hug, listen to a story (again), tell a story (for the 5th time), pull out that old record or just be there. Your loved one may not be able to articulate it, but everyone needs encouragement and you know what your mom, grandpa or grandma loved you first.

So, today, let the tasks go and just take a moment to LOVE your loved one.

When Not Nice Things Happen to Not Nice People

August 18, 2008 by  
Filed under CANCER

I read the New York Times Best-Seller, by Harold Kushner, When Bad Things Happen to Good People, way back in 1981. It’s been reissued several times since. While that book proved a comfort during the time of a sudden loss in my life, I admit that some of the biggest struggles I have faced have been dealing with the “not nice” people in my life who are going through disease challenges such as cancer.

You know exactly who I am referring to.

It could be Aunt Marge who humiliated you by mentioning that you have gained weight when you brought your new boyfriend to the family reunion and asked if you had breast implants just as dessert was being served and you were reaching across the table for a cupcake.

Or that coworker who has stabbed you in the back so often you no longer bother to suture up the wound.

What about your cranky neighbor who purposely lets her dog relieve himself on your lawn and left the evidence there AND denied it, though you saw the entire thing live from behind the living room curtains.

Sure some of these scenarios are humorous, but in reality they aren’t very funny.

This post has taken me weeks to finish precisely because it also isn’t very PC. It isn’t a topic we like to discuss let alone fess up to.

I recently decided it was time to deal with the person in my life who was going through a cancer battle while all the time maintaining the amazing ability to annoy, irritate and push my buttons.

Magnanimous, moi, reached out my hand in a gesture of detente, only to have my entire appendage bloodied and bitten off up to the elbow.

On to Plan B.

First I considered Jonah and the Whale. It’s a fable that rings true no matter what your spiritual background.

It is the story of the reluctant prophet who really didn’t want to have anything to do with those nasty Ninevahites.

So I learned that I am a lot like Jonah:

  • I don’t like being hurt. I tried and was rejected once and that seems like once too many times.
  • Forgive them? How fair is THAT? They’re the ones who are in the wrong.
  • It’s much easier to take superior stance than to get down to their level, which is obviously way down there. After all I have my pride to think of.

Of course Jonah wasn’t really victorious until he overcame these obvious issues and went ahead and sucked it up and did what he was called to do and helped the Ninevahites. Read more

Things Caregivers Do to Hurt Themselves and Their Loved Ones

May 9, 2008 by  
Filed under ALZHEIMER'S

Refuse to ask for help–Caregivers tend to get frustrated that other family members and close friends are not chipping in as they should.  Instead of reaching out, they often adopt the attitued, “if I want it done right, I’ll have to do it myself.”  This is not good for anyone, the caregiver, the family or the one who needs the care.

Play martyr–Martyrdom is noble and had, maybe even still has its place in society.  However, your loved one needs you alive not sacrificing your own health and overall well being, in order to give care.

Grieve alone–Caregivers are people who get things done.  Taking time to share their feelings with others is rarely on the top of the “to do” list.  However, it is very important to not only allow yourself to feel your feelings, but also to share them in a safe and non-judgemental environment.

Fail to nurture relationships–Caregiving is consuming at times, and caregivers tend to become so wraped up in the job at hand that they don’t take the time to feed and nurture relationships with other family members and good friends.

Ignore spouse/significant others–I made a distinction because those who are closest to caregivers may suffer the most.   It’s hard to think about working to keep the flames of marriage going when you are concerned about your loved one 24/7.  Yet, nurturing a relationship on one hand may give you a moment of peace on another to help you as you battle Alzheimer’s disease.

Act reactively instead of proactively–It is so important to know what’s coming in terms of the disease.  Not just to know, but to know and understand how those stages will impact your level of care. Please see my series of posts on the Stages of Alzheimer’s disease. The role of the caregiver changes significantly as the illness progresses.

Fail to plan–I’ve said it before, “If yo fail to plan, then you plan to fail.”  Alzheimer’s care facility, standard long term care facility, in home care provided by family and friends, in home care supplemented by an agency, these are all options that should be carefully considered and not at the last minute when waiting lists and ease of admission may come to bear more heavily on the decision than they should.

Take life too seriouslyCaregiving is very serious (and sometimes depressing) business.  But, it takes much more energy to frown than it does to smile.  So, laugh, read something funny or watch something funny.  You are still alive and you can ENJOY life.

What do you think? What did you do wrong? What’s your blunder?  Maybe you got something right. Tell us about it, leave a comment

Stress and Your Mate

December 8, 2007 by  
Filed under STRESS

Whether you have a spouse, a domestic partner or just someone who is the current live-in love of your life, living with someone close can cause stress. Note, the ‘can’ not ‘must’. Interacting with someone with whom you have that kind of relationship introduces a variety of potential problems, but those don’t have to lead to stress – for either party.

Stress results when someone feels caught in a perceived, unresolvable conflict between “I must” and “I can’t”. They feel there is something they have to do, but are blocked from or don’t have the resources to do.

Close relationships, such as those with a spouse or ‘significant other’ inevitably bring many such problems. Individuals have unique values and interests, preferred lifestyles and even basic differences in pace or approach. Some men are very stoic, even when they’re not repressed. Some let the difficulties life presents ‘roll off their back like water off a duck’, others attack them head on.

Adjusting to the style of another person and dealing with the dozens of daily choices living together presents – especially when the preferences of one party conflicts with another – can be very difficult. But stress results most often when one or both of the two parties is unrealistic, unwilling to communicate or compromise, or are even downright unfair.

Sometimes the only solution is to part ways. But long before that happens, if the relationship is valuable, there are several ways to resolve conflicts that avoid chronic stress.

Acute stress is something of a misnomer. It generally refers to a stress that is short-lived, even though the word ‘acute’ can make the event sound severe. But whether minor or major, such episodes are all but inevitable in close relationships. Health problems, money concerns, conflicts with other family members, disagreements over child-rearing… there’s no end of possibilities.

But acute stress isn’t very harmful. The episode fades or a resolution is found and life returns to normal. When a series of problems occurs, and most importantly when individuals believe they don’t have what it takes to solve them, chronic stress can result.

But the way out, though not easy, is simple. There are, in fact, very rare circumstances that place us in situations that have no resolution. Very few people have no potential resources for resolving them.

No single, concrete event in raising children is all-decisive – with few exceptions. Many couples have worked successfully through times of low income or high debt, and often developed stronger relationships as a result. Most health problems are temporary. If life were nothing but a series of disasters we couldn’t cope with, insurance companies would go broke.

Reducing stress in relationships can be achieved by a series of techniques almost anyone can adopt. Evaluating problems objectively, looking long-term, reminding oneself and each other of the values that formed the relationship initially can go a long way toward lessening the perceived severity of problems.

That also helps build the awareness that sometimes the resource you need most to solve a problem is looking at you across the dinner table.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.