Importance of Detecting Prostate Cancer Early

December 3, 2012 by  
Filed under CANCER

Cancer

Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer that affects men. It develops in the prostate gland, where it either grows slowly or spreads to other parts of the body quickly. This disease occurs when there are abnormal cells in the prostate, although the underlying cause of this isn’t known. It’s important to recognize the signs of this disease since early detection is associated with a higher chance of successfully treating it.

Risk Factors

Prostate cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in men who are over 75 years old, according to the National Institutes of Health. NIH This disease rarely occurs in men who are younger than 40; it’s more common in men who are older than 60. Risk factors associated with this disease include being African-American and having a family history of prostate cancer. Other risk factors include eating foods that are high in fat and drinking too much alcohol.

Signs of Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer typically causes symptoms when it’s more advanced. Common symptoms of this disease include difficulty urinating, pelvic pain, weak stream of urine, blood in urine or semen and leg swelling. Bone pain in the lower back or pelvic region can also occur in some cases. Men who experience any signs of this disease should schedule an appointment with their doctor as soon as possible.

Prognosis

Prostate cancer treatment has a higher success rate when the cancer is found early and hasn’t spread outside the prostate gland. The other factor that affects the prognosis of this disease is how abnormal the cancerous cells are. If the cancer has just started to spread to other areas of the body, treatment can still be successful in some cases.

Testing

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests and digital rectal exams can help detect prostate cancer in the early stages. Men who have a high risk of having this disease should ask their doctor how often they need to be tested. Some organizations recommend that all men between the ages of 40 and 75 years old should have these tests done once a year, while other organizations suggest talking it over with a doctor to weigh the pros and cons first. Mayo Clinic It’s important to keep in mind that elevated PSA levels don’t necessarily indicate the presence of cancerous cells. It’s also possible to have cancer without having elevated PSA levels.

Prevention

Men can lower their risk of having prostate cancer by reducing their fat intake, especially in foods that contain a lot of animal fat. Adding more fruits and vegetables can help prevent prostate cancer. Tomatoes are one of the best foods to add since they contain lycopene, which has been associated with prostate cancer prevention. Exercising on a regular basis might also help reduce the risk of this disease. Lower rates of prostate cancer have been found in men who exercise frequently. Certain medications might also help prevent prostate cancer, although some have also been linked to a higher risk of developing high-grade prostate cancer. Those who are interested in taking one of these medications should talk to their doctor about the risks involved.

When PSA levels are high or the prostate is enlarged, doctors will usually perform a biopsy to check for cancer. If prostate cancer is found, other tests are done to see if it has spread. The treatment methods following a cancer diagnosis depend on how advanced the disease is. These methods range from surgery to hormone therapy and chemotherapy. Men who are successfully treated for prostate cancer will need to visit their doctor often for testing. This is done to make sure that the cancer is gone or hasn’t spread outside the prostate gland.

About the Author:

*** author and link removed *** … // but, test your prostate levels for prevention of prostate cancer.

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Bob Lawrence’s journey with Metastatic Melanoma Cancer

February 18, 2012 by  
Filed under BRAIN, VIDEO

Heart Disease: Worse For Women Than Men?

December 10, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=vCkDjDjbQxk%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Do men really have it easy? Can heart disease really be worse just because you’re a woman? Dr. Bob gives the answer. For more health tips and information visit www.DrBobShow.com.

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Heart Disease: Worse For Women Than Men?

December 10, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=vCkDjDjbQxk%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Do men really have it easy? Can heart disease really be worse just because you’re a woman? Dr. Bob gives the answer. For more health tips and information visit www.DrBobShow.com.

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Heart Disease: Worse For Women Than Men?

December 10, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=vCkDjDjbQxk%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Do men really have it easy? Can heart disease really be worse just because you’re a woman? Dr. Bob gives the answer. For more health tips and information visit www.DrBobShow.com.

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Women’s Health: Ovarian Disease : Polycystic Ovary Syndrome & Fertility

March 27, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=IGoA0QxOn_U%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Polycystic ovary syndrome affects fertility because there is usually an absence of consistent ovulation, making it much more difficult to get pregnant. Explore the options of conceiving with this disease withinformation from a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist in this free video on women’s health. Expert: Dr. Josh Vogel Contact: www.wilmingtonhealth.com Bio: Dr. Joshua Vogel has been a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist for more than 13 years. Filmmaker: Reel Media LLC

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

FDA Women’s Health Video Blog: Women’s Heart Health

March 21, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=KGIKjjDgn7s%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Did you know that heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States? Watch as FDA’s video blog hosts talk through the important signs of heart disease in women. For tips and additional information about heart health, healthy eating and more, please visit: www.fda.gov

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Hot Women Are Bad For Your Health (Study)

March 12, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=6M7C56zrfkM%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

New TYT Facebook Page(!): www.facebook.com Don’t forget to check out Ana’s blog at: www.examiner.com Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com TYT Network (new WTF?! channel): www.youtube.com Check Out TYT Interviews www.youtube.com Watch more at www.theyoungturks.com

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

The Three Basic Health Tips for Wellness by Better Body Nutrition Austin

March 9, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=rMK5lK9b1xg%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

The Three Basic Health Tips for Wellness by Better Body Nutrition Austin In this video Joseph summates all nutrition and wellness practices into three simple tips. These three tips are the secret to living a health long and happy life. This may seem very simple but its not doing these three things that cause illness, disease, discomfort and early death. Be My Friend www.myspace.com Better Body Clinical Nutrition www.nutritionaustin.com Joseph E. Strickland, ACN Applied Clinical Nutritionist This video was produced by Psychetruth http www.youtube.com psychetruth.blogspot.com Psychetruth is empowered by TubeMogul. www.tubemogul.com Music by Jimmy Gelhaar www.jimmyg.us © Copyright 2010 Target Public Media LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Aging as a disease

May 31, 2010 by  
Filed under AGING

My kids turned 7 the other day and typical of kids of their age, they loved having a birthday and were very happy celebrating it. Then one asked me “Is there somebody in this world who is not happy about having a birthday?” Actually there are quite a lot, I told him. Old people mainly who are not happy being reminded they are growing older.

Aging: you can’t stop it but can you fight and postpone it? But is chronological aging a disease? And if it were a disease, can it be managed and treated like a disease? In other words, can we stop the time and put aging on hold? This was the topic of a scientific conference last week aptly called “Turning Back the Clock.”

According to biogerontologist David Gems

“If aging is seen as a disease, it changes how we respond to it. For example, it becomes the duty of doctors to treat it.”

Aging is traditionally seen as a natural biological process even if many of us are not happy about it. People try to slow down the external signs of aging through cosmetic surgery. However, there are currently no drugs in the market for the treatment of aging because drug regulators only approve drugs for specific diseases and conditions but not for a general concept like aging.

Gems continued to explain:

“Because aging is not viewed as a disease, the whole process of bringing drugs to market can’t be applied to drugs that treat aging. This creates a disincentive to pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs to treat it.”

But one can point out that depression used to be a general concept but is now a valid medical condition with lots of treatment options available.

The sceptics will point out that viewing aging as a disease is just another way for pharmaceutical industries to make money, the way they make money with millions of people swallowing anti-depressants each day.

But scientists point out that aging comes with a lot of age-related diseases such as dementia, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and cancer. Currently, medicine is trying to treat each of these specific conditions. They believe that there is a common denominator to all these and identifying and treating this common mechanism, all these conditions can be treated.

One avenue scientists are pursuing is looking at the genes of the very old people and identifying the genetic mechanisms that make them less susceptible to age-related diseases. These genes and the mechanism they control are believed to determine longevity.

According to Andrew Dillin of the Salk Institute in California and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute:

“It is … looking increasingly likely that pharmacological manipulation of these … pathways could form the basis of new preventative medicines for diseases aging, and aging itself.”

Computer Vision Syndrome

January 9, 2008 by  
Filed under VISION

What is Computer Vision Syndrome?

Your work environment could be hazardous to your health! Computer Vision Syndrome is a very real eye problem that affects many individuals who spend a good part of their days staring at computer monitors. But it’s not just the computer monitor that is causing this eye problem.

The environment in which the computer work is taking place can be adding to the problems associated with Computer Vision Syndrome. Inadequate lighting, glare from windows, fluorescent lighting, sitting too close or too far away from the computer monitor and the manner in which the contents are being displayed on the monitor can all aggravate this syndrome.

The letters on a computer screen are not straight lines as they are on printed material, which the eye can easily focus on. They instead consist of pixels or tiny dots on which the eye has to constantly focus and refocus, and that creates fatigue and strain.

Symptoms of Computer Vision Syndrome

The most notable symptom of Computer Vision Syndrome is eyestrain which causes eyes to feel tired and/or sore. However, other parts of the body can also be affected. Headaches, neck aches and backaches are common symptoms. Problems with vision are also symptoms and can include any or all of the following: blurred vision, double vision and/or distorted color vision.

Another symptom is eyes that are slow to change focus. For example, when looking at something in the distance and then quickly changing to look at something close up (or vice versa) there is a lag in the eye’s ability to bring the newer image into focus. The constant work being performed by the focusing muscles makes eyes tired. With Computer Vision Syndrome eyes tend to also have a dry or a burning sensation.

Who is at risk?

Anyone, male or female is at risk of developing Computer Vision Syndrome if he or she spends long periods of time working at a computer. The people who develop symptoms of this syndrome tend to not take breaks, whether physical or visual. Getting up from the workstation and periodically focusing on something other than the computer monitor are important to prevent the onset of Computer Vision Syndrome.

Early detection/treatment

When a person’s daily routine consists of 2 or more hours of work on a computer, it’s important to tell the eye doctor. If the patient is experiencing the symptoms mentioned above, the eye doctor can use a PIRO instrument to test for Computer Vision Syndrome. The purpose of this instrument is to simulate what an individual sees on a computer screen. It’s positioned at a distance comparable to that of the patient’s monitor. Using this instrument, vision is tested. A reduced Snellen card can also be used.

In most cases, computer eyeglasses need to be prescribed to put an end to the symptoms of Computer Vision Syndrome. They generally will have a different prescription than regular eyeglasses. Computer eyeglasses may also include a computer tint, UV tint, anti-reflective coating and possibly a prism.

Color Blindness

December 7, 2007 by  
Filed under VISION

What is Color Blindness?

Color blindness is a condition in which a person cannot distinguish color properly. There are several variations of color blindness and each one relates back to a problem with the functionality of the cells inside the retina that deal with processing light sensitivity. The rod cells are activated by low light while the cone cells are activated by daylight.

The pigments inside each of the 3 cone cells react and respond differently as each absorbs light. Each pigment processes a different wavelength: short, medium and long. In a normal eye, this interaction and overlap between the cones, pigments and the amount of light each absorbs as the eye processes various images is what makes it possible to create the wide spectrum of color that most individuals are able to view.

Color blindness results when one or more of the 3 cone systems is not functioning properly or at all. Some affected individuals are unable to detect any color and the life they see is monochrome. It’s as if these individuals constantly view black and white movies. Called monochromacy, this is the rarest form of color defect. Dichromacy (red-green defects) of which there are 3 different types and anomalous trichromacy (blue-yellow) are more common.

Symptoms of Color Blindness

The main symptom of color blindness is an inability to distinguish and/or correctly identify colors, particularly reds and greens and blues and yellows.

Who is at risk?

In the majority of cases, color blindness is hereditary, something that runs in the family. However, color blindness can also develop as the result of damage to the optic nerve, the eye (specifically the retina) and even the brain. In a few instances, this eye condition has been traced back to chemical exposure including exposure to medicines and poisons.

Interestingly, color blindness is more prevalent in men than women. Age is also a factor in partial color blindness. As the eyes ages, the lens tends to become darker which translates into images taking on a darker hue.

Early detection/treatment

Color blindness is very easy to detect with Pseudoisochromatic Plate tests. The plates contain colored dots, with the background dots being one color. Another dot color forms the image of a number. Someone with normal color vision will be able to distinguish the number whereas someone with a color defect cannot discern the pattern that has been created using the different colored dots.

Color blindness that is inherited cannot be ‘cured’ because pigments are lacking. In cases of acquired color blindness, vision may be corrected if the underlying problem can be treated.

Once the type of color blindness has been determined, an affected individual’s only option is to rely on visual aids to help ‘see’ better. Specially-tinted contact lenses or glasses can help compensate for the inability to distinguish certain colors, but cannot restore ‘normal’ color capacity.

Affected individuals are generally capable of developing their own methods for accommodating their eye condition, and with the help of others, they make modifications to their environments to ensure their safety.

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Combined with Lipitor May Stop or Reverse Disease – Dosages Cut in Half with Fewer Negative Side Effects

March 22, 2006 by  
Filed under MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

March 16th 2006

Combining treatments may improve outcomes for patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), according to research done on mice and published online by the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Scott S. Zamvil and colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco found that mice treated with a combination of Glatiramer acetate (GA) and atorvastatin (Lipitor) demonstrated “a significant prevention and reversal of clinical MS severity” of MS symptoms.

Lipitor is a cholesterol lowering drug that has previously been shown to improve MS symptoms. Glatiramer acetate (Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.’s Copaxone) is a drug currently approved for MS treatment. The researchers found that treating MS with combinations of immune modulating drugs can greatly reduce MS disease.

According to the researchers, treating EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis) mice with the combination therapy caused the animals to lose less myelin, prevented CNS inflammation, and MS disease incidence.

The researchers then treated isolated inflammatory cells called macrophages with these drugs and found that the combination therapy mediated its effects by promoting the secretion of the anti-inflammatory molecule IL-10 and suppressed production of the proinflammatory molecules IL-12 and TNF-alpha.

The researchers believe that the combined delivery of drugs, which act through different mechanisms, may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of MS and reduce the negative side effects. Also the drug dosages were less than the dosages used in regular single drug treatments.

Copaxone has been shown to be 30 to 35 percent effective alone. According to Bloomberg News, all MS drugs have to be injected, and have “severe side effects”. None of the MS drugs are very potent.

Lipitor on the other hand can be taken orally and is considered relatively safe. Lipitor, the best selling drug in the world, appears to block production of immune system agents, called cytokines, involved in the disease process. Currently the University of California, San Francisco is looking for 152 patients at 14 hospitals to participate in clinical trials. These trials will investigate the effect Lipitor alone has on MS. Contact the office of Scott Zamvil, associate professor of neurology at University of California, San Francisco, for more information.

There are 400,000 MS sufferers in the US. The illness causes neurological symptoms that include loss of motor control, blindness and temporary recurring paralysis. The condition occur when the body’s natural defenses are over stimulated and begin stripping the protective insulation, called myelin, from nerve fibers in the central nervous system, which includes the brain, optic nerves and spinal cord.

Dan Wilson
Best Syndication

Source

Copyright 2005 Best Syndication
Last Updated Thursday, March 16, 2006 06:07 PM

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.