My Tips for a Healthier Lifestyle

December 1, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Here are my tips for a healthier lifestyle…if you adopt just ONE of these tips in your life, I promise it will be worth it! 1. Drink one ounce of water per pound that you weigh every day. Eliminate (or minimize) sugary drinks and soda from your diet; they are just unnecessary calories! 2. Keep track of what you eat! You will be surprised how well this works for making you aware of your diet. Online calorie tracking resources are best, because they provide you with accurate calorie counts and calories burned vs. intake reports. Online calorie tracking resources: – www.livestrong.comwww.sparkpeople.com 3. Use supplements, but use them wisely. Only take supplements that you cannot achieve through your normal diet. “Overdosing” on vitamins does not have any additional health benefits. My recommendations for vitamins: -Origins; Hair, Skin and Nails -One-A-Day; Womens Active Metabolism -Flinstones (or any generic brand) Chewable Daily Vitamins (YUM!) 4. Exercise at least 30 minutes every day! Get your heart rate elevated; cardio is key. You will have so much energy after you start exercising regularly. You don’t need to join a gym in order to “work out”- you can run up and down a flight of stairs, jog around the block, or do jumping jacks in your living room and get the same benefits as a treadmill or elliptical machine. Let me know if you have any questions!! I wish you the best of luck on your journey to a healthier lifestyle! My Formspring Account: www.formspring.me

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Hab It: Pelvic Floor Optimal Posture Review

August 21, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Optimal Posture Tips for Women Women’s Physical Therapist Tasha Mulligan discusses female posture and the role it plays in addressing symptoms of pelvic floor weakness such as incontinence and prolapsed.. Special information for pregnant and post-partum women! Poor posture can put stress on your lower back and abdominal basket, exacerbating problems with your pelvic floor muscles. Unless you work to achieve optimal posture, the road to rehabilitation may be longer than necessary. This video will help you understand proper posture and alignment, and how to achieve and maintain it throughout your exercises. Relevant Links: www.balancethecenter.com ; www.healthcentral.com

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Bladder & Pelvic Floor Health Tips for Incontinence, Overactive Bladder, UTI

July 16, 2011 by  
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I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Bladder & Pelvic Floor Health Tips for Incontinence, Overactive Bladder, UTI Ali Bennatt, PT specializes in the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction in men and women at the Relate Center in Austin, Texas. In this video she discusses bladder health and how to determine if you have a healthy bladder pattern. She addresses what is normal and how to assess the health of your urinary tract and normalize your cycle. Ali uses her specialized training in pelvic floor and gynecological physical therapy to assist clients in overcoming the musculoskeletal issues that contribute to sexual difficulties. She is a licensed physical therapist and has been in private practice, treating pelvic floor related disorders in both men and women, since 2000. Visit Ali’s website: www.relatecenter.com Read Ali’s article “Simple Strategies for a Healthy Pelvic Floor” http This video was produced by Psychetruth www.youtube.com www.twitter.com www.facebook.com www.myspace.com © Copyright 2011 Target Public Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. overactive bladder “overactive bladder” healthy urinary tract infection UTI stress incontinence weak lose control pelvic floor urge need to pee pants often urinate overflow bathroom problems health fitness beauty bedwetting leak leakage amazing tips frequency how body works kidney psychetruth

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Birth Control: The Withdrawal Method (Sex Health Guru)

May 17, 2011 by  
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I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Behavioral methods of birth control are 100% free of charge — but they don’t always work. For videos about other birth control options, CLICK HERE: sexhealthguru.com

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Side Effects of Synthetic Estrogen

May 5, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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www.iHealthTube.com Dr. Hyla Cass discourages young women from going on the birth control pill, saying it has dangerous side effect and there are other ways of dealing with PMS naturally. An educational video exclusive on iHealthTube. Twitter twitter.com Facebook: www.facebook.com Myspace: profile.myspace.com

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The Pill at Work (Sex Health Guru Tip)

April 13, 2011 by  
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I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Want to know how the birth control pill works? Here’s the scoop! See videos all about sex and contraception – www.sexhealthguru.com

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Women’s Health: Ovarian Disease : Polycystic Ovary Syndrome & Fertility

March 27, 2011 by  
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I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

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Polycystic ovary syndrome affects fertility because there is usually an absence of consistent ovulation, making it much more difficult to get pregnant. Explore the options of conceiving with this disease withinformation from a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist in this free video on women’s health. Expert: Dr. Josh Vogel Contact: www.wilmingtonhealth.com Bio: Dr. Joshua Vogel has been a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist for more than 13 years. Filmmaker: Reel Media LLC

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Food For Thought—The Impact Of Your Diet On Arthritis

November 27, 2008 by  
Filed under ARTHRITIS

Everyone knows that a healthy diet is the key to living a healthy life.  However, what many people don’t know is that it can also play a huge role in the risk of developing arthritis.  A person’s diet directly affects their weight and food allergies, both of which are directly related to arthritis.  Eating healthfully is a key way of both preventing and managing arthritis.

Managing Your Weight

One major way that diet is related to arthritis is that it directly affects your body weight.  Body weight is a major risk factor for arthritis.  The risk is quite simple to understand: the more that one weighs, the higher their risk of developing arthritis.  Yet, this phenomenon is not so simple to control in real life.

When someone develops arthritis due to their weight, it puts immense stress on their joints.  This makes it difficult to move and walk, let alone exercise.  Many obese or overweight people who are affected by arthritis often adopt a sedentary lifestyle—and yet, this only makes the problem worse.  The vicious cycle is extremely difficult to deal with.  Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients are commonly affected by this never-ending cycle.

It is more important than ever to monitor your diet if you have arthritis, because having arthritis makes exercise nearly impossible!  You can begin managing your arthritis through a diet by avoiding alcohol, sodium, fat, cholesterol, and sugar.

Allergic Reactions

Another reason to monitor your diet when you have arthritis is because certain foods can trigger arthritis flares.  Certain foods can impact the immune system, and affect the production of anti-inflammatory compounds.  Rashes, hives, and asthma are all allergic reactions that could indicate that you have consumed a food that is also an arthritis flare.

There are several other foods that could possibly cause an arthritis flare or worsen arthritis.  These foods include: red meats, chocolate, additives and preservatives, caffeine, salt, and dairy products.

Tips On What To Eat

If you have arthritis and are trying to manage your diet, there are a few tips that could be of help.  First of all, snack on grapes, pineapples, and other fruits.  Many fruits contain the compound resveratrol, which is known for blocking cell inflammation.  Additionally, eating vegetables, especially broccoli, is known to reduce inflammation.  Fish is also a good choice because it is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help to decrease inflammation.

Under Control

For people who suffer from arthritis, diet might seem like an unnecessary thing to worry about.  Yet, the relationship between diet and arthritis is quite clear.  Your diet is a modifiable risk factor for arthritis—and it could be something you need to change.

The Diabetes/Stress Connection

June 11, 2008 by  
Filed under DIABETES

stress.jpgIf you are having a hard time figuring out why your blood glucose levels are high and you feel you have every other area of your diabetes lifestyle under control, consider the stressors in your life.

Stress releases hormones (cortisol and adrenaline) that will increase your blood glucose levels. While this is good on a temporary basis to provide energy to deal with a threatening fight or flight situation, chronic stress keeps your glucose levels elevated which can create insulin resistance and high glucose levels.

There are however those rare individuals out there whose response to stress is a severe DROP in blood sugar.

Dealing with life is stressful. Dealing with life and diabetes is a double whammy.

How do you respond to stress?

  • Do you self medicate with food?
  • Road rage?
  • Smoking?
  • Alcohol?
  • Do you exercise more?
  • Clean the house when you are upset?
  • Do you get depressed when you are stressed?
  • Are tears your way of responding to stress?

Were your coping strategies on the list? Are they productive long term strategies? Do you consider action/response of your body when you utilize those coping mechanisms?
Like anything else, the more you feel in control the better you feel.

The basic way to manage stress is with balance: a balance of sleep, exercise and relaxation.

The experts at the Mayo Clinic say to TAKE STRESS SERIOUSLY! “If you’re stressed, it’s easy to abandon your usual diabetes care routine. The hormones your body may produce in response to prolonged stress may prevent insulin from working properly, which only makes matters worse. To take control, set limits. Prioritize your tasks. Learn relaxation techniques. Get plenty of sleep.”

Specific therapeutic tools to manage stress and get back control:

  • Biofeedback. Biofeedback is one measurable tool. Biofeedback is a methodology which utilizes techniques to assist patients to control body function such as blood pressure and heart beat and muscle tension by responding to their own body reactions. The Continuum Center for Health and Healing describes biofeedback or self-regulation, this way: “…the ability to observe oneself and acquire the skills needed to make changes in one’s physiology, behavior, or even lifestyle in order to promote well-being and health.”
  • Relaxation Techniques: these include meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery and yoga.
  • Journaling: Journaling not only allows you to get your issues out but allows you a way to work through your problems and stressors.
  • Support Groups: Consider online support groups and communities where you can openly discuss issues that are unique to diabetics.

Read more

Exercise To Control Diabetes

January 10, 2008 by  
Filed under DIABETES

Having diabetes is never a picnic. But fortunately, for a very large percentage of those who suffer from the disease, exercise can play a large role in the management of the condition. Not only does it improve overall health, helping to stave off future complications and deal with dips in well-being, it directly improves the diabetic condition. But, it needs to be done properly.

Before embarking on any exercise regimen, a diabetic should consult his or her physician and insist on clear answers and feasible suggestions. The diabetic will need to find out which exercises are safe and under what conditions. That will vary from person to person, and often day to day.

The level of blood glucose rises, for example, in response to exercise. But how much and how rapidly differs from person to person and day to day. A high blood glucose level, say 300 mg/dL can rise even higher with vigorous exercise. Those with Type 1 diabetes who have a fasting glucose level above 250 mg/dL will likely have ketones in the urine. Exercise can raise that further, producing a dangerous condition called diabetic ketoacidosis.

Alternatively, insulin treatments can produce hypoglycemia (having too low a level of glucose in the blood). But consuming carbohydrates to level it off may have undesirable side effects, such as encouraging excess body fat. That excess in turn may help push those with pre-diabetes into full blown diabetes, over time.

Any exercise routines should be realistic and begun slowly. Many diabetics need to reduce their level of activity below what would be normal for another person. But they can still benefit from the many positive health effects of a good routine. Just as with the elderly or others who may need to curtail some kinds of activity, the diabetic needs to monitor their condition carefully and exercise appropriately.

Think long term. Even people without any medical condition can become discouraged and give up on exercise too easily. Working muscles that have been sedentary (a lifestyle that often raises the risk of acquiring diabetes in the first place) can lead to soreness and discomfort. That creates negative incentives to continue the exercise program. Starting slowly and working up to greater effort can solve that problem. Adopt exercise as a part of an overall lifestyle, not as a targeted cure for any specific problem.

Walking several times per week is a good start. For those who have access to a pool, swimming is a good cardiovascular exercise category that is easy on the joints.

At first, you may feel a bit too tired to even get started. That may be the result of low blood sugar. If your physician approves, eating a small snack can help get you up for the effort. A small adjustment to medication may work for others.

Monitoring is important, even during exercise, since it can change blood glucose levels quickly. A special watch is available that provides a timer for measuring routines, but will also monitor glucose level. But whatever method you choose, keep a close eye on things. Stop if you feel dizzy, nauseous or experience symptoms generally.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.