Funny Hidden Camera That Girl On The Street Corner Salaries :)

June 11, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=9nw8tymE7bU%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

tinyurl.com FUNNY CAMERA Amazing Facts Numbers Fun Facts Optical Illusions Optical Illusions 2 Optical Illusions Pre-School Test for U Phrases for Work Quotes by Great Women Quotes by Wise Old Men Riddles Seen On T-Shirts Sillies Smile SMS Abbreviations Meaning Someone and you Statistics about Sex Strange but true coincidents Super Silly Quiz Tips for Managers Tongue Twisters Twisted Fun Thoughts Time Fun Facts Valid doubts Viral Email Health Tips

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

3 Ways to Appear Awkward to Women

April 16, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=y10xQIPexL4%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Greg D Crosariol is extremely awkward and attempts to teach you how to pick up women. TWITTER twitter.com FACEBOOK apps.facebook.com ITUNES 3.ly MERCH petercoffin.viralprints.com IPHONE APP http ANDROID APP 3.ly

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

How many hours do spend in front of the screen?

January 25, 2011 by  
Filed under . ANNOUNCEMENTS, HEART AND STROKE

In a previous post, I discussed a study that indicates that 2 hours is the maximum duration of time we should spend in front of a screen during leisure hours. To recap what the study authors have to say:

“This is a new research area, which has attracted attention only in the past 18 months to two years, but it has implications both for public-health recommendations and clinical guidelines. I think there is a direct message from our research, which is that there should be a cut-off of two hours daily screen time as a maximum during leisure hours.”

Unfortunately, I do not fully understand why this 2-hour limit should only apply to leisure hours. What about those who spend the whole day in front of a computer screen? And what about the fact that the boundary between working and leisure hours becomes hazy? A nephew of mine earns his living by playing the X-Box 8 hours a day.

 So how much time do we really spend in front of the screen? There are many numbers and figures around but surprisingly few from reliable sources and up-to-date data. Here are some figures  from SixWise.com

According to many sources, Americans spend 2.6 million minutes on Facebook each day.

The American Heart Association conducted a survey in 2009 and reported the following figures on social network use:

  • 37% of respondents (35% men, 39% women) spend less than an hour social networking
  • 18% spend 1 to 2 hours
  • 7 % spend 2 to 3 hours
  • 3% spend 3 to 4 hours
  • 3% spend more than 4 hours, especially those aged between 18 and 25.

According to figures from the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) (as quoted in kidshealth.org):

Computer-associated health problems: the elderly are at risk, too

September 20, 2010 by  
Filed under AGING, HEALTHCARE

How’s this for statistics on computer use:

  • People spend between 2 and 15 hours in front of the computer each day (according to self-reported online surveys).
  • Americans spend 2.6 million minutes on Facebook each day, according the latest statistics. Other top sites are Google, yahoo, and YouTube.

Ok, so you’d say, so what? Well, how about this?

  • A Flowtown survey revealed that the average age of Twitter users is 39 years, just 5 years younger than the average age of LinkedIn users (source: MLC).
  • 47% of Internet users aged 50 to 64 years old are regular social media users.
  • 26% of those above 60 have at least one social media account.

The point is, computer and Internet use are not restricted to the younger generation any more. These statistics indicate that many older adults spend lots of time sitting still in front of the computer. Health experts have expressed concerns about today’s kids and adolescents having too much “screen time”, with serious health consequences. But what about the elderly?

Sedentary lifestyle

The more time one spends on Facebook, the less physically active one is. It is great to have the elderly get on the information superhighway and keep up with the times. But not at the expense of their health. Overweight, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease are just a few of the health conditions that result from a sedentary lifestyle.

Specific computer-related health problems

Then there are the health problems specifically associated with computer work.

Eye and vision problems

These are the most common problems associated with computer work. Symptoms include eye strain or fatigue, headaches and blurred vision.

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD)

MSDs are also common complaints from frequent computer users, most especially damage to the tendons, muscles and nerves.

Carpal tunnel syndrome (also known as median neuritis) is a painful condition of the hands and wrists. It is caused by pressure on the median nerve, which runs from the shoulder, down the arm, to the hand. The syndrome can be caused by “working with bent wrists, a high rate of repetition using the hands, a lack of rest for the hands and wrists.” In other words, typing on the keyboard and playing video games.

Back, neck and shoulder problems, especially in the lower back are commonly reported when “sitting for long periods in a chair that does not provide support to the lower back (lumbar) region.”

Thus, working for long periods in the computer can hasten the development or progression of certain age-related conditions such as vision deterioration, arthritis, and impaired mobility.

Doctors are advised to issue warnings and recommend preventive measures not only to the young but to their older patients as well. You never know who is sitting in front of the computer these days.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.