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bone : Battling For Health

Help Little Sophie In Her Battle Against Stage 4 Bone Cancer

January 12, 2012 by  
Filed under CANCER, VIDEO

10 Health Tips for Women Age 65 and Older

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=Ng7C9WoaRZc%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

This video provides 10 health tips for women age 65 and older. These recommendations are based on expert clinical opinion presented in UpToDate online version 18.3. This video was produced by Dr. Nicholas Cohen, MD. The content of this video is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions.

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Fitness .. Black Friday Workout and One tip you should try

December 5, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=hWJssYOKaEc%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

What I am going to do on Black Friday And a tip I have thought about doing to keep me motivated ….

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Happiest Woman in America – Health Tips [11-02-2011]

November 12, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=pX7E4o0ocdg%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

A woman (/ˈwʊmən/), pl: women (/ˈwɪmɨn/) is a female human. The term woman is usually reserved for an adult, with the term girl being the usual term for a female child or adolescent. However, the term woman is also sometimes used to identify a female human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as ‘Women’s rights’. The Old English wifman meant ‘female human’ (werman meant ‘male human’. Man or mann had a gender neutral meaning of ‘human’, corresponding to Modern English ‘one’ or ‘someone’. However in around 1000AD ‘man’ started to be used more to refer to ‘male human’, and in the late 1200s began to inevitably displace and eradicate the original word ‘werman’). The medial labial consonants coalesced to create the modern form ‘woman’; the initial element, which meant ‘female,’ underwent semantic narrowing to the sense of a married woman (‘wife’). Visit MeTee.com The place for publishing and printing t-shirts & always free shipping. Become a channel sponsor for 30 days for /day meseed.com Have any ad you want play in each video (any one video can go viral with tens-of-thousands of hits) Or donate to keep this channel going: meseed.com Thank you for your generosity – Subscribe for Breaking News. Like/Dislike, Comment, Favorite and share on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ to get the word out on this video. Put this video on your channel with a more interesting title (never know if this channel will get taken down): www.keepvid.com Archive video with keepvid. Signup for

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Fitness Tips – Help prevent Osteoporosis

July 12, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=7kY4UYQByTE%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Russ Melgar, fitness instructor, demonstrates some exercises that may help reduce the risk of Osteoporosis

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How to Improve Your Bone Health

April 9, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=VxdAngUPQhQ%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Dr. Sherrill Sellman lists several tips of what we can do to improve women’s bone health at any age. For more information, visit www.ihealthtube.com

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Lead exposure and heart health

November 24, 2009 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

We are constantly exposed to the environmental pollutant lead. What are the health effects of this  exposure?

There have been studies that linked concentrations of lead in the blood to cardiovascular disease but supporting evidence has been weak. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the University of Michigan School of Public Health believe they may have found a better indicator of cumulative lead exposure, an indicator that can be linked to number of diseases including cardiovascular disease. The researchers look at levels of lead in the bone.

Where does the lead come from?

Lead is everywhere. In the food we eat, in the things we use daily. In the air we breathe. Air pollution has been the main source of lead exposure, mainly from emissions from cars using leaded fuel. Since the introduction of lead-free gasoline and the banning of leaded fuel in many countries (including the US in the 1990s), the lead levels in the air have significantly decreased. However, lead accumulates in the body especially in the bone and remains there for years. Thus, health problems due to lead exposure are not brought about by acute but rather by chronic toxicity. People in US who were born before the 1990s have been exposed more to lead than the younger generation and are still carrying the pollution burden in their body.

The researchers looked at the levels of lead in the blood and bone of 868 male study participants. The results showed that

  • High levels of lead accumulated in the bone are associated with high risk of mortality from all causes, especially cardiovascular disease.
  • Men with the highest lead levels are 2.5 more likely to die from any disease than those with the lowest levels.
  • Men with the highest lead levels are 6 times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than their peers with the lowest levels.

This increased risk for death is not dependent on socioeconomic factors such as age, smoking, education, race, alcohol, physical activity, or underlying conditions such as obesity, high density lipoprotein or total cholesterol levels, hypertension or diabetes.

According to lead author Dr. Marc Weisskopf,

“The findings with bone lead are dramatic. It is the first time we have had a biomarker of cumulative exposure to lead and the strong findings suggest that, even in an era when current exposures are low, past exposures to lead represent an important predictor of cardiovascular death, with important public health implications worldwide.”

So what does lead do? Lead might badly affect our health due to oxidative stress, a mechanism closely linked to cardiovascular disease. Lead exposure has also been linked to stiffening of the arteries and hypertension.

Photo credit: stock.xchng

The link between heart failure and bone fractures

November 6, 2008 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

Depression, poor quality of life, and now, increased risk for bone fractures. Is there no end to the problems facing heart failure patients? Unfortunately, a study by Canadian researchers found a link between heart failure and incidence of bone fractures.

“Patients who are newly diagnosed with heart failure in the emergency department are at least four times as likely to suffer serious bone fractures over the next year compared with patients presenting to the emergency department with other CV disorders.”

The analysis was based on hospital data from over 16,000 patients. 2041 of these patients were just newly diagnosed with heart failure. The remaining 14,253 had other cardiovascular conditions. The incidence of any orthopedic bone fracture among heart failure patients was more than 4 times higher (4.6% vs. 1%) than those without heart failure. The figures did not significantly change when corrected for age, sex, and medications. Of all types of fractures, hip fractures are the most common with more than 6% higher risk among heart failure patients. This is especially disturbing because hip fractures are difficult to heal, cause prolonged disability and increase the risk for thrombosis and lung infections.

The mechanism behind the heart failure – bone fracture link is not clear and requires bigger and more in-depth studies. A possible explanation might be the fact that long term heart failure can cause secondary parathyroidism. Parathyroidism is a condition wherein the parathyroid glands are enlarged. The glands are responsible for controlling the breakdown of calcium in the body. Dysfunction of the parathyroid glands can cause bone loss and high levels of blood calcium. Other factors which can further weaken the bones may be poor nutrition and lack of exercise among elderly depressed heart failure patients.

Heart failure is a chronic disease that worsens over time until the heart completes loses the capacity to pump. According to the American Heart Association, “more than 5 million Americans are living with heart failure, and 550,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.” According to the study, heart failure is also a leading cause of hospitalizations and mortality in Canada. It occurs in 2.2% of the general population and 8.4% in adults older than 75.

The results of the study also highlight a possible link between heart failure and osteoporosis. The incidence of osteoporosis is about 25% in females and 12% in males among adults 50 years old and above.

The study continues to say that

heart failure and osteoporosis also share common risk factors such as older age, female sex, smoking and type-2 diabetes.

However, with the proper preventive measures, such as lifestyle changes and knowing the early signs, heart failure need not be a death sentence.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.