My Tips for a Healthier Lifestyle

December 1, 2011 by  
Filed under VIDEO

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=pJOYdJw2Zms%3Fversion%3D3%26f%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Here are my tips for a healthier lifestyle…if you adopt just ONE of these tips in your life, I promise it will be worth it! 1. Drink one ounce of water per pound that you weigh every day. Eliminate (or minimize) sugary drinks and soda from your diet; they are just unnecessary calories! 2. Keep track of what you eat! You will be surprised how well this works for making you aware of your diet. Online calorie tracking resources are best, because they provide you with accurate calorie counts and calories burned vs. intake reports. Online calorie tracking resources: – www.livestrong.comwww.sparkpeople.com 3. Use supplements, but use them wisely. Only take supplements that you cannot achieve through your normal diet. “Overdosing” on vitamins does not have any additional health benefits. My recommendations for vitamins: -Origins; Hair, Skin and Nails -One-A-Day; Womens Active Metabolism -Flinstones (or any generic brand) Chewable Daily Vitamins (YUM!) 4. Exercise at least 30 minutes every day! Get your heart rate elevated; cardio is key. You will have so much energy after you start exercising regularly. You don’t need to join a gym in order to “work out”- you can run up and down a flight of stairs, jog around the block, or do jumping jacks in your living room and get the same benefits as a treadmill or elliptical machine. Let me know if you have any questions!! I wish you the best of luck on your journey to a healthier lifestyle! My Formspring Account: www.formspring.me

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Dressing for the winter outdoors

February 23, 2011 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

We are in the mountains once again to enjoy the snow, the sun and the fresh air. Every year, European families spend at least a week in some winter get away to do winter sports and enjoy nature. I moved in Europe almost 20 years ago but I never went on winter holidays until I had a family of my own. In many parts of North America, winter holidays are kind of a luxury despite the many beautiful ski resorts in the US and Canada. Here is Switzerland, almost everybody does it. You can go to the high-end resorts like St. Moritz or Gstaadt or you can go to simpler, down-to-earth places. You can get there by helicopter, by car or by train or by bus, depending on your budget. You can check-in in a five-star hotel or rent a 1-room apartment. Or you can commute up every morning and come down again every evening. In other words, winter sports and holidays are for everyone, not only the well-off. It is part of the culture of this country to be active, summer or winter.

So here we are, a family of 4 squeezed in a 4-bed hotel room without TV or phone. But the ski lift is just a stone’s throw away and we get free entry to the local indoor pool. The local bus is for free and the apfel strudel is just scrumptious! The kids can ski the whole day and I can go snow shoe walking. What more can I ask?

When I first ventured out into the winter cold, I did not know a thing about winter gear and how to protect myself from the elements. Nowadays I know better how to dress myself and my little boys. Here are the recommendations from the American Heart Association Start! Walking This Winter brochure:

Layer your clothing. Layering provides the best insulation for a workout.

Cover your head, hands and feet. You can lose a lot of body heat if your head is exposed.

Cover your head and ears or use a face mask to protect yourself from cold and wind. Your hands and feet are the farthest points from your heart and are the least insulated. Gloves or mittens and wool socks insulate and wick moisture away.

In addition, sturdy walking shoes are of utmost importance:

These recommendations, by the way, are not only for the mountains in winter time. It applies for winter outdoors in general.

Get Hip to Hip Health Women’s Health Expert Shares Tips on L

December 25, 2010 by  
Filed under Video: Health Tips for Women

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=sEx2cbq8MTw%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Get Hip to Hip Health Women’s Health Expert Shares Tips on Lowering the Risk for Hip Fracture to Lead an Active and Healthy Lifestyle it’s the perfect time to talk about one of the leading – yet often overlooked – health risks associated with falls: hip fracture. Although one-in-three women will suffer a hip fracture by the age of 90, awareness and concern of the risks remains low and not enough women take the necessary steps to protect their hips. Most women have a love-hate relationship with their hips, but keeping them healthy is vital for a full, active life. Highly regarded women’s health expert, Donnica Moore, MD (“Dr. Donnica”), shares tips on how to keep hips healthy and how to reduce the chances of suffering a devastating hip fracture. She talks about the importance of a balanced diet and calcium and vitamin D supplements in keeping bones strong – as well as the role of physical activities and body strengthening exercises for preventing falls. Weight-bearing exercise – like walking, jogging, dancing or even gardening – can improve balance, coordination and muscle strength. Talent/Guest: Donnica L. Moore, MD Dr. Donnica is a physician, educator and media commentator – as well as a highly regarded women’s health expert and advocate. As the founder and president of DrDonnica.com, a popular women’s health information website, she is well-known for her engaging and entertaining style – which she refers to as “Medicine Lite.” Dr. Donnica is the “Doctor on Call

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Get Hip to Hip Health Women’s Health Expert Shares Tips on L

December 18, 2010 by  
Filed under Video: Health Tips for Women

I just found this health related video on YouTube … and thought you might enjoy it!

youtube.com/watch?v=iTg8O1N5Dhw%3Ff%3Dvideos%26app%3Dyoutube_gdata

Get Hip to Hip Health Women’s Health Expert Shares Tips on Lowering the Risk for Hip Fracture to Lead an Active and Healthy Lifestyle it’s the perfect time to talk about one of the leading – yet often overlooked – health risks associated with falls: hip fracture. Although one-in-three women will suffer a hip fracture by the age of 90, awareness and concern of the risks remains low and not enough women take the necessary steps to protect their hips. Most women have a love-hate relationship with their hips, but keeping them healthy is vital for a full, active life. Highly regarded women’s health expert, Donnica Moore, MD (“Dr. Donnica”), shares tips on how to keep hips healthy and how to reduce the chances of suffering a devastating hip fracture. She talks about the importance of a balanced diet and calcium and vitamin D supplements in keeping bones strong – as well as the role of physical activities and body strengthening exercises for preventing falls. Weight-bearing exercise – like walking, jogging, dancing or even gardening – can improve balance, coordination and muscle strength. Talent/Guest: Donnica L. Moore, MD Dr. Donnica is a physician, educator and media commentator – as well as a highly regarded women’s health expert and advocate. As the founder and president of DrDonnica.com, a popular women’s health information website, she is well-known for her engaging and entertaining style – which she refers to as “Medicine Lite.” Dr. Donnica is the “Doctor on Call

Tell us what you think about this video in the comments below, or in the Battling For Health Community Forum!

Don’t let the heat stop you from being active

July 21, 2010 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

Heart health and extreme heat do not go well together. And this summer, we are experiencing a heat wave. Under such circumstances, we cannot blame people if they’d rather stay at home and stay sedentary. However, do not let the summer heat beat us. We still need physical exercise regardless of the heat outside. Here are some tips on how to stay active this summer. I compiled this from recommendations of the American Heart Association (AHA) as well as from my own experience.

Here is what the AHA recommends:

Here are the things that I do to keep active:

Go for a walk or run early in the mornings or evenings. I normally jog during my lunch break. But in this summer heat, this isn’t possible anymore. I now go early mornings, just before 8 am, as soon as my kids go off to school. Even though I’d rather get an early start with my work, I rearranged my schedule to accommodate a 30-minute run each morning. Luckily, as a self-employed, I can be flexible.

Last April, while on holidays in tropical Asia, a morning jog on the beach and an evening stroll under stars were a great way to beat the tropical heat.

Take the stairs. When I had to go on client visits or shop at a mall, I try to take two to three flights of stairs rather than take the lift or the escalator.

Go to the forest or up the mountains. There was a day last week when an early run wasn’t possible. So I did my run at noon – in the forest. You would be surprised how trees and their shade can make a difference. On the weekends, we go hike in areas of higher altitude (thus cooler temperatures) but also in wooded areas. Last week we had this beautiful walk at 800 m above sea level, which is still low by Swiss standards but was cool enough. We aim to go higher this weekend.

Swim in the lakes and rivers. After the walk last weekend, we ended up bathing in the nearest river. The cold water flowing down from the mountains were so refreshing and would beat water from any pool anytime. We are lucky that Swiss lakes and rivers are so clean!

Take note that there are some indoor skiing areas in some countries. If you live in one of these countries (example: Dubai), then this is your chance to start learning how to ski.

Go to the gym. When everything else fails, the gym is still your best bet. Again, in tropical Asia a couple of months ago, this was the only option to stay active while staying in the big cities. And I almost invariably go for the treadmill and the pedometer.

Heat is not an excuse for being sedentary. Let’s get moving, no matter what.

Mountain walking in the winter time

March 3, 2010 by  
Filed under HEART AND STROKE

I am no ski bunny. I gave skiing (both downhill and cross country) a try a few years back but gave up after the first lessons. My tropical upbringing and my overall lack of coordination prevented me from conquering snow sports. And if somebody is about to suggest snowboarding, forget it. I’d rather stand on my own two feet. That doesn’t mean to say I can’t get to be active and enjoy winter holidays.

Living in a country like Switzerland, winter holidays are must. Aside from the usual school break between Christmas and New Year, there is what the Swiss call “sports holidays”, a 2-week school break in February/March. And sports refer to winter sports, of course.

Since we moved to Switzerland almost 4 years ago, we go up to the mountains for a week during the sports holidays just as the locals do. My men (husband and twin sons) would ski and I would walk or hike.

And this is what this post is all about – to tell you about winter walking – about being active during your winter holidays even without the skis. The cold and the snow are no excuse for being a couch potato. Besides, tropical upbringing aside, I love the snow and I love the mountains.

 Here are a few tips for you should you consider a walking winter holiday.

Check before you book. Before booking, check what the resort town has to offer in terms of activities for non-skiers. Offerings would range from crafts, wellness to walking tours with or without snow shoes.

Have the right clothes and gear. Do not think about making a fashion statement. Think in terms of comfortable winter clothes which are warm and waterproof. Fleece shirts are especially popular nowadays because they are light yet warm. Lined, flexible trousers are great for walking. Head gear and gloves are also needed. However, the most important gear of all are the shoes. They should be comfortable and waterproof and should have the right soles for walking. You might want to consider MBTs or snow shoes if you aim to walk long.

Start in the morning. Make the most of the short daylight in winter time by starting your walk in the morning so you can be back before dusk.

Keep on the official winter walking trails. Not all trails are navigable in the wintertime for safety reasons as well as for nature protection. Access to some places is forbidden so as not to disturb hibernating animals. In Switzerland, winter trails are clearly marked and distinct from summer trails. In addition, avoid walking on cross-country skiing trails.

Bring water and food but not too much. A small rucksack with a small bottle of water and an apple or a small sandwich would come in handy in case you get thirsty or hungry during the walk. However, a heavy bag with loads of stuff can be very cumbersome when walking.

Walk as your health allows it. Walks can be as short as 1 hour and as long as 6 hours, depending on your level of fitness. You should listen to your body and not try to overdo it.

Watch out for weather and avalanche warnings. Check the weather bulletins before you leave for your walk. Snow storms and avalanche present serious dangers when you are in the mountains so you should take the warnings seriously.

Inform somebody of your destination. You should make sure somebody knows the direction you are taking. Just in case.

Walk with somebody or with a group. Walking tours for groups are usually organized by the local tourist office. However, you might not be happy with a just once-a-week tour. Having a walking partner is a great motivation to get out there. Even four-legged walking mates (dogs) are great company.

Finally, do not rush. Take it easy and enjoy the scenery and the mountain air. Remember, this is not a race or a sports competition. This is vacation.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.