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Archive for 'SCHIZOPHRENIA'

Battling DEPRESSION,HEALTHCARE,SCHIZOPHRENIA

The History Of Madness – Infographic

Categories: DEPRESSION, HEALTHCARE, SCHIZOPHRENIA | June 19th, 2014 | by BFH Admin | no comments

“People are crazy and have always been. But the ways we’ve dealt with the off-kilter have changed drastically over time…”

Take a look over this infographic created by Best Counseling Degrees to see how!

The History of Madness
Source: BestCounselingDegrees.net

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Battling HEALTHCARE,SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia patients and hospital injuries

Categories: HEALTHCARE, SCHIZOPHRENIA | August 10th, 2010 | by Raquel | no comments

Schizophrenia is often equated to mental illness and patients with schizophrenia are often treated as mentally ill. This is probably why patients who suffer from schizophrenia are more likely to incur injuries during hospitalization than non-schizophrenic patients, according to a recent study by researchers at Bloomberg Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. These injuries can occur during hospital admissions due to medical conditions that may not be related to schizophrenia itself include decubitus ulcers (bedsores) and serious complications such as sepsis, infection and postoperative respiratory failure.

The researchers looked at records of hospital discharges in 3,605 U.S. hospitals from 2002 to 2007 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The study looked at 269,387 hospitalizations of patients with schizophrenia and more than 37 million hospitalizations of patients without schizophrenia.

The almost double than usual rate of postoperative respiratory failure is especially a cause for concern as this complication can be life-threatening. In the study, the researchers found 24.2 incidences of postoperative respiratory failure per 1,000 hospitalizations among schizophrenia patients vs 9.2 incidences for non-schizophrenic hospital patients. 36.6 vs. 27.7 incidences of bedsores per 1,000 hospitalizations were recorded for patients with vs. without schizophrenia.

So why are people with schizophrenia vulnerable to such injuries? The study authors believe that “the combination of medical illness, medications that patients with schizophrenia already take and communication gaps put them at risk for the elevated patient safety events that we observed.

Some experts are not surprised. According to Chris Koyanagi, policy director at the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law in Washington.

“It does not surprise us that this study found various ways in which people with schizophrenia were not receiving optimum health care. We hear anecdotal reports from individuals that their primary care providers and medical specialists do not always listen to their physical complaints seriously, but write them off as part of their mental illness.”

The results of the study highlight the need for better health care delivery not only to patients with schizophrenia but others suffering from some form of mental disorders. Schizophrenia affects about 1.1% American adults.

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Battling ALZHEIMER'S,SCHIZOPHRENIA

Blood tests for neurological disorders

Categories: ALZHEIMER'S, SCHIZOPHRENIA | July 14th, 2010 | by Raquel | no comments

The hunt for biomarkers in the blood that can be used to screen for neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and dementia seems to be making headway. Two groups of researchers report about promising tests using biomarkers. Let us take a look at their discoveries.

Predicting Alzheimer’s

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London report that they may have develop an early test for Alzheimer’s disease – a test that can predict its onset up to ten years before the symptoms appear.

The biomarker used for the test is a protein called clusterin which surrounds the brain plaque characteristics of the disease. High clusterin levels were found to be closely linked to brain shrinkage and rapid memory loss. Clusterin is easily and reliably detectable in the blood. As a biomarker for Alzheimer’s, clusterin seems very promising.

According to lead author Dr Madhav Thambisetty:

“We are very enthusiastic about these results because they identify a strong signal in blood from clusterin protein that appears to be relevant to both pathology and symptoms in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, adding further evidence to the role of clusterin in Alzheimer’s disease… A primary goal in Alzheimer’s research is to develop an inexpensive, easily administered test to accurately detect and track the progression of this devastating disease.  Identifying clusterin as a blood biomarker that may be relevant to both the pathology and symptoms of the disease may bring us closer to this goal.”

Detecting schizophrenia

Researchers from Cambridge University report about another potential blood test – this time a test for diagnosing schizophrenia. Currently schizophrenia is diagnosed by psychiatrists based on patient interviews, a method which is not necessarily accurate, sensitive and objective.

The researchers discovered a set of 51 biomarkers with linked to schizophrenia. These biomarkers are detectable in a blood sample and can be used as a diagnostic tool complementary to the patient interview-based method. The test is called VeriPsych

According to Professor Sabine Bahn, Director of the Cambridge Centre for Neuropsychiatric Research, who developed VeriPsych together with his collaborators at Psynova Neurotech and Rules-Based Medicine:

“Schizophrenia is a complicated and challenging disease, yet current diagnostic approaches continue to be based on patient interviews and a subjective assessment of clinical symptoms. We expect VeriPsych to be used as an aid to this current process, and we hope it will provide the psychiatrist with additional confidence in their evaluation, as well as speed up the process.”

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Estrogen therapy for schizophrenia?

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | June 21st, 2010 | by Raquel | no comments

Hormones can affect our moods. Women can attest to this and some men learn to recognize the signs. When I am feeling out of sorts, my husband would ask: “are you ill or is it just the hormones?”

Hormone replacement therapy is a common strategy in managing postmenopausal symptoms in women, symptoms that include hot flashes and mood swings

A recent study by the researchers at the Tel Aviv University reports that hormone replacement therapy particular estrogen may also have protective affects against a more serious problem – schizophrenia.

The researchers have demonstrated this in lab rats wherein removal of the ovaries induced not only menopausal symptoms but also development of psychotic symptoms. When the animals were given estrogen replacement, the psychotic symptoms disappeared. Estrogen was replacement was even more effective than the anti-psychotic agent haloperidol in this animal experiment.

According to Prof. Ina Weiner of Tel Aviv University’s Department of Psychology

“We’ve known for some time that when the level of estrogen is low, vulnerability to psychotic symptoms increases and anti-psychotic drugs are less likely to work. Now, our pre-clinical findings show why this might be happening.”

The link between low estrogen levels and psychotic symptoms are not nothing new. A woman’s hormonal levels are regulated by her menstrual cycle, yet still fluctuate during her lifetime. There are times when drastic changes bring about psychological problems, such as in cases of postpartum depression or postmenopausal symptoms.

The results indicate a potential for estrogen supplement as a stand-alone treatment or adjunct therapy to convention treatment of schizophrenia.

“Antipsychotic drugs are less effective during low periods of estrogen in the body, after birth and in menopause. Our research links schizophrenia and its treatment to estrogen levels. Men seem less likely to begin schizophrenia after their 40s, which also suggests that estrogen is the culprit.”

However, estrogen replacement therapy has been questioned in recent years due to its association with increased risk for cervical cancer and heart attacks. The risks and benefits of estrogen replacement therapy should therefore be weighed seriously before this “hormonal treatment can be used for a behavioural condition.”

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Does mom’s flu increases baby’s schizophrenia risk?

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | March 15th, 2010 | by Raquel | no comments

Flu and pregnancy had a hot topic since the outbreak of the H1N1 influenza last year. Health authorities lament the fact that the public has been very sceptical of the H1N1 flu vaccine and only very few of the high-risk individuals which included young children and pregnant women were vaccinated.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill investigated the effect of flu infection to the unborn child. They tested the effect of mild flu in pregnant rhesus monkeys and monitored the babies’ development.

12 rhesus macaques were infected with a mild influenza A virus in the early part of its 3rd trimester, 1 month before the due date. 7 pregnant monkeys who were not infected served as controls. The babies of flu-infected mothers were born healthy and did not differ in terms of weight, gestation length and neuromotor, behavioral and endocrine responses compared on babies of non-infected mothers.

After 1 year, the babies were monitored using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans and their behaviour observed. Their results showed that babies exposed to flu infection in utero had smaller brains compared to non-exposed babies. The scans also detected reductions in the amount of gray matter in the cingulate and parietal lobe and of white matter in the parietal lobe. The structural changes observed were very similar to changes observed in humans with schizophrenia.

According to researcher Dr. John Gilmore, professor of psychiatry in the UNC School of Medicine

“The brain changes that we found in the monkey babies are similar to what we typically see in MRI scans of humans with schizophrenia. This suggests that human babies whose mothers had the flu while pregnant may have a greater risk of developing schizophrenia later in life than babies whose mothers did not have the flu. Normally that risk affects about 1 of every 100 births. Studies in humans suggest that for flu-exposed babies, the risk is 2 or 3 per 100 births.”

The study results confirm previous reports from similar studies using rodents. In those studies, flu infection during pregnancy increased the risk for schizophrenia in the rodent offsprings.

According to lead author Sarah J. Short

“This was a relatively mild flu infection, but it had a significant effect on the brains of the babies. While these results aren’t directly applicable to humans, I do think they reinforce the idea, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that pregnant women should get flu shots, before they get sick.”

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Mentally ill: Victims rather than perpetrators of violence

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | August 25th, 2009 | by Raquel | no comments

hand_hang_onThose with mental disorders are to be feared and looked upon a people of violent and criminal tendencies. This is the stereotype of the mentally disordered. However, contrary to this common misconception, individuals with mental disorders actually tend to be victims rather than the perpetrator of violence. This is according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University.

Lead researcher Brent Teasdale, an assistant professor of criminal justice found that patients suffering from symptoms like delusions, disorientation and hallucinations tend to be victimized.  These are also the people who are prone to alcohol use and homelessness, thus making them even more vulnerable.

“They actually have higher rates of victimization than they have of violence commission, which I think is counter to the stereotype that highly symptomatic, obviously delusional, visibly mentally disordered people are dangerous, unpredictable and violent. There’s no one size fits all approach to these delusions, but the odds of victimization are multiplied almost by a factor of two when a person experiences these delusions.”

Mental disorders come with a stigma and those without mental problems tend to misinterpret the symptoms, actions and behavior of the mentally disordered, become defensive, and may even strike preemptively, all in the name of self-defense. Teasdale, however, believe that people tend to become overdefensive.

Teasdale looked at the data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study, which is a longitudinal study of psychiatric patients released from three psychiatric hospitals. During the study, the participants were interviewed about violence committed against them, stress, symptoms and social relationships. The interviews were performed every 10 weeks for one year. The study findings showed that when symptoms of mental disorders worsened, that is when the patients are most vulnerable to violent behaviour from others. This is because these are the times when the patients are “focused on their internal states and have fewer cognitive resources available to devote to interactions with other people.”

The finding…of the study suggest

Teasdale concludes:

The stereotypes persist because people are unaware of the victimization risk to people with mental illness. If they learned that victimization risk were higher than the violence commission rates, I think that would help alleviate some of that stigma and help people think about people with mental disorders in a different way.”

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

How anti-psychotics affect your metabolism

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | June 4th, 2009 | by Raquel | 2 comments

drugsPatients who present with psychotic symptoms (e.g. as in those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) are usually prescribed with anti-psychotic drugs. These drugs are mostly effective in controlling the symptoms. However, they come with side effects that can be detrimental to physical health.

Previous studies have demonstrated that second generation anti-psychotic drugs can affect glucose and lipid metabolism, leading to problems with body weight and cardiovascular disorders. It is not wonder that the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended monitoring of blood sugar and lipid levels in patients on anti-psychotics.

However, a study survey discovered that actual metabolic monitoring only occurs in about 10% of these patients, a clear indication that the guidelines on monitoring are not being followed by psychiatrists.

According to lead author Dr Dan W Haupt of the Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO

“Possibly many psychiatrists do not feel comfortable performing metabolic monitoring, because they were not trained to consider the effects of mental illness and treatment on the whole patient, and many practice in environments that are physically separated from the rest of the healthcare system… However, this represents a missed opportunity for psychiatrists to reduce the impact of medical comorbidities in their patients”

The said guidelines were endorsed by 4 medical organizations in 2004, namely:

  • the ADA
  • the American Psychiatric Association
  • the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
  • the North American Association for the Study of Obesity

and strongly recommend that all patients receiving second-generation antipsychotics should have fasting blood glucose and lipid levels determined at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment.

Unfortunately, the study reveals that there is a general tendency among practitioners not to adapt the guidelines. Furthermore, young psychotic patients are the least likely to be screened and monitored.

This is an issue of major concern, considering the increasing incidence of psychotic disorders in adolescents and young adults. In addition, young American patients tended to be on anti-psychotics than their European counterparts. This increases the risks for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity among the younger generation.

Dr. Haupt continues:

“While the benefit of these medications likely outweighs the risks in many individuals, psychiatrists cannot discuss informed consent meaningfully with patients and families without monitoring patients for any treatment-emergent metabolic side effects.”

Second generation anti-psychotics are helping people manage mental illness. Without proper metabolic monitoring, we may be treating mental illness at the expense of physical health.

Photo credit: stock.xchng

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Toxoplasmosis, dopamine and schizophrenia

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | April 29th, 2009 | by Raquel | no comments

laboratory22Schizophrenia is a complex neurological disorder, believed to be the results of multiple genetic and environmental factors. One important piece to the puzzle that is schizophrenia is toxoplasmosis. Toxoplamosis is a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Previous studies have reported that the parasite may play a role in the development of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Researchers from the University of Leeds’ Faculty of Biological Sciences (UK) may now be able to tell us the mechanism behind this link. It seems that the parasite infects the brain to form cysts. In producing the cysts, the parasite produces the enzyme tyrosine hydoxylase, a precursor of the neurochemical dopamine. As a neurotransmitter, dopamine plays a very important role in now the brain controls certain aspects of movement, cognition and behaviour. Abnormally high levels of dopamine have been linked to many neurological disorders, including psychosis and schizophrenia.

Dopamine’s role in mood, sociability, attention, motivation and sleep patterns are well documented and schizophrenia has long been associated with dopamine, which is the target of all schizophrenia drugs on the market.

Toxoplasmosis is transmitted via cat feces but can also be food borne. Unwashed vegetables and undercooked infected meat are possible sources of the parasite. It is a fairly common disease. In the US alone, 22% of population has supposedly cysts in the brain. In the UK, it is estimated to be between 10 to 20% of the population. Toxoplasmosis has always been thought to be harmless. Except in infected cases involving pregnant women and those who are immunocompromised (where it can be fatal), the cysts do not cause any harm or symptoms. The recent research results however, suggest that toxoplasmosis may not be as benign as it was originally thought to be.

According to lead researcher Dr Glenn McConkey

“Toxoplasmosis changes some of the chemical messages in the brain, and these changes can have an enormous effect on behaviour. Studies have shown there is a direct statistical link between incidences of schizophrenia and toxoplasmosis infection and our study is the first step in discovering why there is this link.”

Schizophrenia research lags behind compared to research studies on other neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. With the current knowledge on toxoplasmosis and dopamine, we might be just a bit closer to understanding this complex disease.

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Common Delusions In Schizophrenia – Various Types And The Danger They Pose To You

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | April 4th, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | 2 comments

By Sheldon Pilsworth

Among the different types of schizophrenia that have been diagnosed by science, certain variants (in particular paranoid schizophrenia) tend to result in symptoms of delusions among patients. To look at common delusions in schizophrenia, it is critical to firstly define delusions.

Typically, delusions are untrue beliefs held by the individual patient that are irrational, despite evidence to the contrary or not at all in-line with that particular patient’s normal cultural base.

Common delusions in schizophrenia among paranoia patients involve false persecution or the irrational belief that other people are out to cheat, conspire against, plot, discriminate against, victimize, harass, spy on or poison them. They might believe that this is being directed at them or their family members.

As such, someone suffering from schizophrenia may be suspicious of almost every little everyday thing. For instance, when walking down the street, he or she may sense that every eye is on him or her, that people are talking about them, that every phone being used is a device for monitoring their every move, that even the guy sweeping the road is an “agent” observing them.

Such delusions can get very bizarre. A patient might believe that the radio or TV is talking directly to them or about them. Or a neighbor is using telepathy to read and control their thoughts.

A common variant of such bizarre delusions is the belief that the CIA or FBI or some secret government agency has been able to implant wires or a radio device into the patient’s brain which enables them to monitor his or her thoughts, and even dictate their behavior and actions.

Other common delusions in schizophrenia are what are referred to as “delusions of grandeur” where the patient might believe he or she is someone famous or important, or knows someone famous or important. Sufferers might believe they are historical figures like Jesus Christ or Napoleon Bonaparte, or they might think they are the President Of the United States. They might refer to their “close friendship” with the Pope or Mick Jagger.

A particular dangerous delusion is one where the patient believes he or she has superhuman powers. This is probably brought on by the popular culture of superheroes in comic books, TV and the movies. Regardless of the source, patients might hurt themselves if they choose to call on their “superpowers” for example flying off a 10-story building, or leaping across a river.

As can be seen, there are quite a few common delusions in schizophrenia. When encountering such cases, it is critical that medical care workers and family and friends of the patient monitor closely for situations where the patient might endanger their lives or the lives of those around them as a result of such delusions.

What exactly is schizophrenia? How do you develop it? How dangerous is someone suffering from schizophrenia? Can it really be cured? Discover all this and more at www.SymptomsOfSchizophrenia.net

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sheldon_Pilsworth

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia Diseases

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | March 24th, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | one comments

By Robin Kumar Lim

Schizophrenia (literally “split mind”) is often thought of as a split or dual personality. However, this disease is best defined as a disorganization of normal thought and feeling. It is probably caused by the malfunctioning of the cells through which information flows within the brain. Symptoms usually appear in late adolescence or early adulthood, and extreme mental stress almost always triggers them. The illness is lifelong, but acute attacks tend to come and go, and usually occur at times of emotional upheaval or personal loss.

What are The Symptoms?

Some popular novels, plays and movies have encouraged us to think of schizophrenia in extremely narrow and dramatic terms. Schizophrenia has been presented quite often in terms of the split personality, two seemingly individual and separate people living within the same body.

For most people with schizophrenia, an attack begins with a gradual, or occasionally sudden, withdrawal from day-to-day activities. The person’s speech may become increasingly vague, and he or she may seem to be unable to follow a simple conversation. An acute attack happens unexpectedly. Often the onset is so gradual that it is difficult to know when psychotic symptoms appear. Among such symptoms are apparently disconnected remarks, along with blank looks, that are followed by sudden statements that seem to spring into the speaker’s mind.

Schizophrenics often believe that others hear and “steal” their thoughts. Sometimes they fear they have lost control of bodily movement as well as thought, as if they were puppets. They frequently believe they hear voices, often hostile ones. Less commonly, they have hallucinations of odd physical sensations, of being given poison, or otherwise being attacked by others. In time many schizophrenics build up a set of beliefs in a fantasy world. They may express exaggerated feelings of happiness, bewilderment, or despair. They may laugh at a sad moment or cry without cause. Or they may seem devoid of feeling, so that it becomes almost impossible to make emotional contact with them.

There are several types of schizophrenia that are characterized by the predominant symptoms, but the only practical distinction that most doctors now make is between the paranoid and other types. The main symptom of a person with paranoid schizophrenia is constant suspicion and resentment, accompanied by fear that people are hostile or even plotting to destroy him or her.

What are The Risks?

Most young and middle-aged patients in mental hospitals are there because they are schizophrenic. About 1 person in 1000 has been treated for the disorder. Men and women are equally susceptible. Paranoid schizophrenia is most common in early adulthood (late 20’s through 30’s).

The abnormality of brain chemistry that underlies schizophrenia can be inherited, but if it runs in your family, you will not necessarily have schizophrenic attacks. You may, however, have either a “schizoid personality” (a tendency towards extreme shyness and withdrawal) or a “paranoid personality” (a tendency towards over-sensitivity and distrustfulness) .

People who have attacks of schizophrenia in its most severe forms may physically harm themselves or others, or may try to commit suicide .

What Should be Done?

If you suspect that someone in your family is schizophrenic, try to get them to see a physician. It may not be easy. People who are becoming mentally ill often refuse to admit it. Even those who realize that something is wrong have a fear of being “put away.” But medical care is vital. Do not leave a person who seems extremely disturbed alone. The presence of a relative or friend to reassure them, or even keep them from hurting themselves until help arrives, may be essential. People with symptoms similar to those of schizophrenia are usually admitted to a hospital for a preliminary period of observation. During this time tests are carried out to make sure these symptoms are not due to a physical illness such as a brain tumor.

What is Treatment?

Severe cases must be treated in a hospital. Treatment usually involves the use of drugs, psychotherapy and rehabilitation.

The most effective drugs are regular doses of special tranquilizers designed to modify abnormal brain chemistry. As symptoms gradually disappear, doses are reduced, and all medication may be discontinued when the acute attack ends. Some people, however, need long-term medication. They may either take pills regularly or be given an injection every two to four weeks. Occasionally antidepressant drugs are also prescribed . In rare cases electroshock therapy (EST) may be recommended.

Techniques of psychotherapy vary, but the goal is the same: to help the patient understand the stresses that contributed to the current attack. This can help the person learn how to prevent future stresses from leading to further illness.

The final stage of treatment is rehabilitation, which helps people who are recovering from attacks to regain normal skills and behavior patterns. In the early stages of hospital treatment schizophrenics are generally given occupational therapy. As their condition improves, they are given increasingly complex tasks and pressures, and these eventually approximate the tasks and pressures of the world outside. Once the acute phase of the illness is over, the schizophrenic prepares for a return to the outside world by making periodic visits from hospital to home or to a half-way house.

What are The Long-Term Prospects?

Many people recover from an attack of schizophrenia well enough to return to a relatively normal life. But they may have further attacks. In some people the condition becomes chronic. Such a person will always be withdrawn and emotionally unresponsive, but they generally avoid severe attacks of the disorder with the aid of constant medication.

Author has an experience of more than 4 years writing about diseases and conditions He also holds experience writing about diseases treatment and diseases causes

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robin_Kumar_Lim

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Why Knowing About Schizophrenia Is Important

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | March 24th, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Mike Selvon

The scary thing about schizophrenia is that sufferers may be so confused by the symptoms that they are unable to tell what is real and what is fantasy. For instance, when serial killer David Berkowitz saw black dogs barking out orders to kill, he believed they were actually there.

Many schizophrenics keep their voices and thoughts to themselves, for fear of being labeled “crazy.” Another schizophrenic, Janice Jordan, mentioned being unable to tell her counselors about a delusional figure known as “The Controller” who barked orders at her during psychotic episodes.

The more patients learn about the illness and its many effects, the better equipped they are to handle the symptoms. Unfortunately, taking life-long medication is also a realistic assumption on the road to recovery.

Schizophrenia research reports some interesting findings. For instance, the mental illness is largely caused by a neuro-chemical imbalance of Dopamine, Seratonin and Norepenephrine.

In a normal brain, the frontal lobe increases its blood flow and the “listening” part of the brain diminishes. PET scans reveal that in a schizophrenic brain, the frontal lobe is active but the “listening” part remains just as active.

The sensory overload usually causes a hallucination. People who are born with it generally have irregular brain cell patterns. Drugs and stress do not cause schizophrenia, but they can certainly exacerbate the symptoms. In some cases, family members who understand very little can agitate the symptoms by using an accusing tone of voice or reacting angrily to the sufferer.

Family members who know about schizophrenia can learn to recognize symptoms of an acute attack: a change in personality, social withdrawal, sleeplessness, agitation, using words that do not make sense and seeing things that aren’t there. It is important to create an environment that facilitates recovery. Keeping peace and serenity at home, helping the schizophrenic set realistic goals, sharing tasks, gradually increasing independence and encouraging new hobbies can all provide schizophrenia support.

There are many misperceptions about schizophrenia. One is that schizophrenia is the same as multiple personality disorder (MPD), which is simply not true. MPD is often characterized by two or more separate and distinct “personalities” which sometimes go by different names, display different mannerisms and have entire lists of unique likes and dislikes.

By contrast, schizophrenics exhibit different behavior, as well as suffer delusions and hallucinations. However, they maintain a basic sense of self, afflicted by mood swings and fragmented thinking. Another misperception is that sufferers are violent by nature.

Because of cases like David Berkowitz or Herb Mullin, the general public associate schizophrenia with murderers – but the only real danger for 99% of schizophrenics is self-harm. By educating the public, diagnosis and recovery can be more effective.

A free audio gift awaits you at our portal site, where you can enrich your knowledge further about schizophrenia. Your comment is much appreciated at our mental illness blog.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mike_Selvon

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia Difficult To Treat

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | March 19th, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Sharon A Bell

Schizophrenia is the most common and severe form of psychosis or thought disorder. It affects both men and women and appears to run in families. Because the exact cause of this condition is unknown, it may be difficult to treat and is usually permanent.

“About one percent of the population has schizophrenia, which is a disease of disorganization of social and psychological function including social withdrawal and eccentric behavior,” according to Drs. Donald S. Kornfeld and Philip R. Muskin in “The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Complete Home Medical Guide.”

There are many types of schizophrenia. In the catatatonic type, the patient may exhibit excitement and lack of interest alternately. In disorganized schizophrenia, the person is incoherent and either has no emotions or shows the wrong ones at the wrong time. Paranoid schizophrenia is characterized by bizarre delusions. The individual may believe that he or she is a famous star, is being chased by aliens or being hunted by agents who want to kill him or her.

“There may be a loosening of associations, with the affected person’s conversation jumping from one idea to a completely unrelated one. Or the schizophrenic may chatter away and yet fail to convey any information. Speech is vague, very abstract, or repetitive. The schizophrenic may play with language, making up new words that seem highly important but make no sense to anyone else,” said Dr. David E. Larson, editor-in-chief of the “Mayo Clinic Family Health Book.”

Schizophrenia may appear during adolescence or in late adulthood. The former is marked by lack of interest in social activities and personal hygiene. The schizophrenic’s face is expressionless and his attire is strange or eccentric. He talks in an unusual way and his statements may sound humorous or absurd. In between those bouts of disordered behavior, the schizophrenic may seem normal at times.

“Hallucinations are common, and the person is especially likely to hear voices, although schizophrenia is not to be confused with cases of multiple personality. The schizophrenic’s face tends to be expressionless and the voice is a monotone. The normal sense of self has been lost,” Larson added.

The second variety of schizophrenia often appears in the late 20s or early 30s. Abnormal speech, thought and behavior patterns usually arise from a stressful event.

Severe forms of schizophrenia, especially if the patient appears to be dangerous to himself/herself or to others, is best treated in a hospital. Treatment includes electro-shock therapy (which uses electric current to treat depressive disorders), antipsychotic drugs to reduce excitement and improve the person’s thought processes, and psychotherapy (a method of treating emotional problems by means of establishing a good relationship between the therapist and the patient).

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Sharon Bell is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premier online news magazine www.HealthLinesNews.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sharon_A_Bell

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Surviving The Suicide of a Child

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | February 29th, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | one comments

By Terrye Harris

On December 13, 2004, my world shattered into a million pieces. After a 2 year long battle with schizophrenia, my youngest son, Jonathan took his own life at the age of 19. The day Jonathan died, I kept telling myself this is the worst day of my life. Little did I know through the haze of shock that surrounded me,that there would be many more worse days to follow.

The first six months, it was all I could do to keep breathing. During this time I believe I could have actually laid down and willed myself to die. The only thing that stopped me was knowing that I could not leave my remaining sons and my grandchildren, as they also were trying to deal with this horrific loss. I was acutely aware that they needed me, their mother, now as never before. So somehow, I managed to keeping breathing and keep moving through life one step at a time.

At the six month point, I began to realize that I had to find help dealing with my loss and heartache. Rage consumed me, rage that the mental health system was ineffective in dealing with my son, rage that my son had to fight this mental illness to begin with, rage that I lost my beloved son. I started grief counseling and I joined a parents of suicide survivor support group. The parents support group has helped me with every step that I have made on this journey. It was not long before I realized that being able to talk to other parents who had suffered the same loss, was as essential to my well being as the air I need to breathe. Through the counseling and support group I have come to understand that what I feel is completely normal, that I am not losing my mind.

I strongly urge anyone who has lost someone to suicide, to find a support group to connect with.

It has only been a little over 15 months for me, I am still new on this journey which lasts a lifetime. I have been through the first birthday, the first memorial day, the holidays where the empty place at the table stabs at my already broken heart. I think of Jonathan 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The pain is so all consuming there are no words to adequately describe it.

But I have survived, I am surviving and I will survive, but it is not an easy road. I take one day at a time and deal with that day as it comes. That’s all I can do right now, that is all any of us in this nightmare can do. I survive for those that I love who remain here with me. I survive to make sure that my son, Jonathan is remembered. As long as I live he will not be forgotten.

There are a lot of statistics on suicide, I survive to remind people that there are faces behind those numbers. Faces of children, brothers, sisters and spouses who were loved by family and friends. That behind those faces were wonderful people who had much to contribute to the world we live in.

When I heard about the memorial quilt for Tennessee, I knew that my son’s picture had to be there. Jonathan’s picture is on one other quilt, a suicide memorial wall and in a memorial book. I don’t place my son’s picture and name on these memorials for me, I do it for him. To show the world how much he is loved and how deeply his absence hurts.

I try to tell Jonathan’s story every time an opportunity arises. Schizophrenia,depression, bipolar diseases are serious mental illness, often terminal. Suicide occurs when these diseases become fatal. I survive to try to raise awareness that the mental health system must be improved, to prevent others from having to walk in my shoes. I look at my grandchildren and worry for their futures if they or their children ever have to face the disease.

The day I buried my son, I also buried a piece of my heart. I will miss him until the day that I take my last breath. Any joy that I experience is bittersweet knowing that he is not here to share it with me. Some days, the blanket of shock still cushions me, it all seems so surreal. He’s not really gone, he is just in the other room. Other days the pain rips through me as if it will tear me completely in two. This is the way of the journey of grief.

My faith in a loving and merciful God , my faith that Jonathan is happy and no longer suffering, my faith that I will see my son in eternity sustains me on this road. And I draw comfort from knowing that death cannot destroy what is important. That Jonathan is still my son and always will be, that I am still his mother and always will be and most importantly that I will love him for all eternity. Love is all powerful and cannot be destroyed by death. Often, the world is changed one person at a time. And because of this, it is my obligation to the world and my son to survive.

Terrye Harris
www.pos-ffos.com
www.pos-ffos.com/groups/soc.htm

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Alternative Treatment For Schizophrenia and Manic Depression

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | February 21st, 2008 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Robin Brain

Mental health problems are severe when the person becomes out of touch with reality. They may develop false beliefs about who they are or what is happening, feel persecuted by external forces, or believe they have been given special powers. They may hear voices, discussing their thoughts or behavior, or telling them what to do, or they may see things that are not there (hallucinations).

When someone is out of touch with reality in this way, they are called psychotic. Some people have only one episode of psychotic illness in their life, others have several with remission in between, and others have them most of the time. Alternative therapies can be useful for all these people but may not be appropriate in a crisis. Conventional drug medication can usually prevent psychotic episodes, but people who are very distressed or dangerous to themselves or others may need the shelter and protection of a hospital or specialized care unit.

Schizophrenia

Each sufferer’s experience of schizophrenia is unique. Thoughts and feelings are dramatically disturbed and the world is experienced very differently. The person’s behavior may appear bizarre to others. Schizophrenia does not mean “split personality”as is widely believed, but is a word used to describe a wide range of symptoms and conditions.

It is not known what causes schizophrenia: one theory is that a person’s genetic makeup makes him or her vulnerable, and that it is triggered off by stressful events. People diagnosed as schizophrenic are rarely violent, but they are often very frightened and isolated because of their distressing symptoms.

Symptoms of schizophrenia include jumbled, disordered thinking, paranoia, false beliefs, hearing voices, apathy, lack of concentration, and depression.

Treatment

Conventional drug treatment can help control some of the symptoms of schizophrenia (such as hallucinations) but may also create many new symptoms. Alternative therapies can be used alongside conventional treatment for these problems.

Manic Depression

Manic depression involves mood swings: periods of deep depression and over-excited or manic behavior. There may be periods of varying stability in between these extreme highs and lows.

During mania, sufferers are euphoric, feel self­important, excited, and extremely talkative. They may go on spending sprees, be unable to sleep, be irritable, or angry. They have no awareness of changed behavior. During the depressive periods (usually longer) they feel despair, guilt, and worth­lessness.

Music, which can access mood states without recourse to language, may be a helpful therapeutic tool in the treatment of psychotic illness.

Treatment

It is important to avoid stressful situations, and finding the right therapy and therapist is vital.

Relaxation Techniques

Meditation, visualization and relaxation exercises can all help.

Consult a qualified practitioner/therapist for:

Talking Treatments – Taking part in supportive psychotherapy and counseling can help reduce the risk of a relapse by helping sufferers to understand the condition and cope better with problems and stresses. Group or family therapy can help with the communication process. It is thought, however, that psychotherapy, which probes into the past, can be too stressful for people with manic depression or schizophrenia, but some sufferers do find it helpful. Some sufferers may prefer cocounseling.

Read out for Strength ball training. Check out arthritis and diagnostic tests

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robin_Brain

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia and Psychosis Cure

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | December 27th, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | 2 comments

By Christina Sponias

Only a philosopher could discover that the human being is completely absurd since this fact means that humanity is totally crazy. A psychiatrist could not come to that conclusion without being considered crazy.

Only a poet could listen to the inner voice of the unconscious wisdom, recognize her ignorance and feel how horrible it is to live in a place where everyone is crazy.

The cure of schizophrenia and psychosis is the total and absolute respect to the moral principles of goodness. A schizophrenic is someone who is completely dominated by the wild side of his or her conscience.

In case the patient is a murderer, one must learn how to forgive oneself, which is usually impossible to achieve since no one can forgive one’s own faults when they have caused despair and misery.

Schizophrenia is a very serious mental and psychic disease that cannot be cured because the wild side has completely dominated the human conscience. There is no human personality in the psychic sphere. This is why schizophrenics cannot recuperate their human conscience once they lose it.

However, they can learn the meaning of their actions and can regain their humanity if they are willing to endure suffering. Suffering is medicine when it gives the patient the necessary conditions that help one become sensitive.

In case schizophrenic patients are victims of other people’s cruelty, they must learn how to forgive their enemies, which is impossible because their enemies hurt them too much.

Schizophrenia is the result of human craziness, the massive craziness that governs our world, a world where terror, violence, immorality, hypocrisy, poverty and indifference coexist. This is the insane world of the crazy human being!

Psychosis is also the result of the same global insanity…

In fact, schizophrenic and psychotic patients are the biggest victims of violence and indifference.

However, they can regain their mental, psychological and emotional health through dream interpretation, even though the process is very difficult and time-consuming. Everything is difficult when we have to deal with diseases as terrible as schizophrenia and psychosis.

Time and many efforts are required, but the patients can be cured!

This is a miracle!

We can cure these horrible diseases and save the people who are affected by them today, but we must surely focus on craziness prevention from now on!

We must put an end to all the horrors of our lives, so that schizophrenia and psychosis ceases to exist in our population.

Massive psychotherapy is indispensable for humanity if we wish to save the human race and our own planet, since we have almost destroyed all the natural sources, and created an imbalance in the nature of Earth.

Unconditional and unrestricted peace, truth, wisdom, patience, piety and goodness are the cures for schizophrenia and psychosis.

Only when we become organized and everyone will be sensitive instead of being indifferent to the horrors they “don’t have the power to eliminate,” will humanity be characterized by psychological, mental and emotional health.

Prevent Depression and Craziness through the scientific method of Dream Interpretation discovered by Carl Jung and simplified by Christina Sponias, a writer who continued Jung’s research in the unknown region of the human psychic sphere.

Learn more at: www.booksirecommend.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christina_Sponias

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Dreams Prevent and Cure Schizophrenia

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | December 23rd, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Christina Sponias

Many people told me that my articles are depressing. However, I only say the truth. I’m not a marketer trying to sell plastic happiness in paper bags. I have to show you what is bad, so that you may understand what is really good.

The wise unconscious used the exact same method to gradually show me the truth about human nature. At one point, I started feeling disgusted for learning so much about terror, violence and hate.

However, it has to be this way because we are not used to examining the negative in depth; we avoid thinking about it. However, we must study what is negative, so that we may understand what is really positive among many things that appear to be good while in fact they are not.

I continued Carl Jung’s research through dream interpretation in the unknown region of the psyche. When I discovered the anti-conscience, I could not believe that I would survive after fighting this monster! It is another conscience inside our brain, a demoniac and evil conscience. It belongs to us, but we cannot see its content, while it can see the content of our conscience and interfere in our thoughts.

My battle against craziness was based on fighting negative thoughts, enduring unbearable sensations and feelings and always keeping myself occupied with many people, and praying. I worked all day in my mother and uncle’s store in the centre of Athens. I experienced many attacks from the wild conscience, but I concealed from everyone what was happening to me. I had to control my behavior, work and never give in.

I obeyed the directions I received from the wise and saintly unconscious in my dreams and in signs in my daily reality to a tee. I experienced craziness while keeping my human conscience alive, which has never been done before.

I even had to face hallucinations, observing that several images appeared in front of my eyes while they were wide open. When a person experiences a hallucination, it suddenly appears right in front of their eyes and they cannot help but look at the images that appear. I didn’t believe them because I knew they were hallucinations.

After 8 terrible months of such extraordinary experiences, I considered myself cured-the hallucinations, the horrible sensations and feelings and the strange, immoral and hatred-filled thoughts disappeared from my mind. I had won the battle!

However, I had many other fights ahead in my long, painful and dangerous path, fighting human craziness at the social level.

I had to explain to everyone what I learned and prove everything scientifically in my book.

I discovered that God is responsible for the wise unconscious that produces our dreams, and I found many other scientific proofs of His existence in biology and astronomy.

I studied in a Catholic school for 12 years, even though I lost my faith and became a complete atheist when I was 15 because I suffered a terrible car accident, where a dear friend died instantly. I lost my memory and movements. My recuperation was a miracle, but I was very angry with God because He didn’t save my friend. While everyone was telling me that I should thank God because He protected me I only hated Him because He didn’t protect Marina and I only wanted to commit suicide.

I didn’t do it because a friend showed me that it would be unfair. I had to live…

This tragic accident prepared me to face schizophrenia when I was 28 years old, after continuing the research that Jung abandoned because he was afraid of craziness.

I had to face what he didn’t, in order to see the entire truth and not only be able to interpret dreams better than my mentor, but also, to be able to prevent schizophrenia and cure any form of craziness much better than any psychiatrist of our time.

I showed you everything that is negative in order to protect you and in order to prepare you for the development of your personality.

Today, you can easily and safely learn everything that I had to learn facing so many dangers, because I can give you a map of the path and show you how you can avoid all the dangers and exactly where the treasure is, so that you may find it by yourself.

The treasure is the wisdom and the happiness you will discover after eliminating your wild side and completely developing your conscience through interpretation of dreams and signs in your daily reality.

Prevent Depression and Craziness through the scientific method of Dream Interpretation discovered by Carl Jung and simplified by Christina Sponias, a writer who continued Jung’s research in the unknown region of the human psychic sphere.

Learn more at: www.booksirecommend.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christina_Sponias

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia Naturally

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | December 20th, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By David McEvoy

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disease. Approximately one percent of the population develops schizophrenia during their lifetime – more than two million Americans suffer from the illness in any given year. Although schizophrenia affects men and women with equal frequency, the disorder often appears earlier in men, usually in the late teens or early twenties; women are generally affected in the twenties to early thirties. People with schizophrenia often suffer terrifying symptoms such as hearing internal voices not heard by others, or believing that other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. These symptoms may leave them fearful and withdrawn. Their speech and behaviour can be disorganised and strange to the extent that they may be incomprehensible or frightening to others.

How is Schizophrenia Diagnosed?

There is currently no physical or lab test that can conclusively diagnose schizophrenia – a psychiatrist usually makes the diagnosis based on clinical symptoms. Physical testing can rule out many other conditions (seizure disorders, metabolic disorders, thyroid dysfunction, brain tumour, the effects of street drug use, and so on) that sometimes have similar symptoms.

What causes Schizophrenia?

Although the exact cause of schizophrenia remains unknown, experts agree that schizophrenia develops as a result of interplay between biological predisposition (for example, inheriting certain genes) and environmental factors. These lines of research are beginning to converge: brain development disruption is likely the result of genetic and/or environmental stressors early in development (during pregnancy or early childhood), leading to subtle alterations in the brain. Environmental factors later in development can either damage the brain further and further increase the risk of schizophrenia, or lessen the expression of genetic or neurodevelopment defects, thus decreasing the risk of schizophrenia.

Treatment for schizophrenia

The American Psychiatric Association publication ‘Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia’ states: “Antipsychotic medications are indicated for nearly all acute psychotic episodes in patients with schizophrenia.”

There is also a significant overlap in terms of the medications for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (Manic Depression). There are two main classifications of medications (from a layman’s perspective); the traditional antipsychotic medications (Haldol, etc.), and the newer, ‘atypical’ antipsychotic medications that have come out in the past decade (Clozapine, Geodon, Seroquel, Risperdal, Zyprexa, Abilify, etc.). It is recommended that sufferers or their carers speak to online support groups to get in touch with others, and to hear about their personal successes and problems with the different medications. It is also a good idea to read as much as possible regarding the medications available, and talk with a psychiatrist, to identify the medications that may be appropriate. It should be kept in mind that whilst both the older and newer medications can greatly help a person with schizophrenia, they all have significant side effects that vary according to the individual. No medication available, unfortunately, constitutes an actual cure for schizophrenia.

A natural treatment for schizophrenia?

While the conclusions drawn range from the positive to the negative, research does suggest that people with schizophrenia may benefit by a reduction in symptoms when they take fish oil capsules that are high in the EPA (a type of Omega-3 fatty acid) form of oil. It is important to be careful about the type of fish oil you are using, as not all fish oils are effective. Researchers at the University of Sheffield tell us: “What people really need to be looking at is the amount of EPA in the fish oil they are buying. Our data from previous studies suggests that DHA is of little use in the treatment of schizophrenia, but EPA is the substance that yields the best results. Dosage wise it is suggested that about 2,000 mg/day to 4,000 mg/day (2 to 4 grams/day) should help.”

A research review article from 2005 in the journal Drugs states: “The evidence to date supports the adjunctive use [i.e. in addition to antipsychotic medications] of omega-3 fatty acids in the management of treatment unresponsive depression and schizophrenia. As these conditions are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus, omega-3 fatty acids should also benefit the physical state of these patients.” (Drugs, 2005; 65(8):1051-9).

Fish fats, and the oils extracted from them, contain two biologically-active omega 3 fatty acids, DHA, EPA. There are good theoretical reasons why both might be important in the brain. However, with regard to schizophrenia, evidence is accumulating that it is the EPA which is really helpful, whereas DHA may not be beneficial in this context.

The strongest evidence comes from a study at Sheffield University by Dr Malcolm Peet and his colleagues. They did a study in patients with chronic, partially treatment-resistant schizophrenia. These patients continued on their existing medications. They were then randomised on a double-blind basis to receive either a placebo, or high EPA fish oil from sardines or anchovies, or high DHA fish oil from tuna. In other words, all the treatments were coded so that neither the patients nor the doctors knew which patient was receiving which treatment until the trial had been completed and the code broken. When the code was broken, the results were very clear. The placebo patients, as is usual in such experiments, showed a small improvement. The DHA patients also showed a small improvement, but in fact a lesser one than was evident in the placebo group, raising the possibility that DHA may not be helpful. In contrast, the patients on EPA showed a significant improvement which was comparable to that seen with the newer antipsychotic drugs, yet without the side effects.

Other studies have also shown that the same EPA rich oil as was used in the Sheffield study is very helpful in improving symptoms even in those who have a shorter history of schizophrenia. It therefore seems that the best fish oils to use are those which are high in EPA.

These findings have been fully embraced by the Schizophrenia Association of Great Britain, which recommends EPA fish oil along with other nutritional supplements on a daily basis to help treat this condition.

Conclusion

The current evidence points towards this natural essential fatty acid being beneficial for schizophrenia especially when run alongside current antipsychotic medication.

Any good doctor or nutritionist will tell you that the best way to get any nutrient is to eat a very balanced diet. In the case of Omega 3 oil this would be in the form of fish. Sadly due to the pollution levels found in our oceans today eating large portions of fish every day is not advisable.

Therefore anyone with schizophrenia who wants to supplement their diet with omega 3 oil must purchase fish oil capsules that are high in EPA. Make sure at point of purchase that the capsules are free of toxins and contaminates and that they also have a high EPA to DHA ratio, as these types of capsules were found to be more effective by some leading doctors in the UK.

Copyright 2005 David McEvoy

The author Dave McEvoy has CFS and bipolar disorder with a history of schizophrenia in his family. Dave also runs a high quality supplement site www.mind1st.co.uk

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Mcevoy

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Smoking Marijuana And The Risks Of Schizophrenia

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | November 19th, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | one comments

By Christian Shire

Only a philosopher could discover that the human being is completely absurd since this fact means that humanity is totally crazy. A psychiatrist could not come to that conclusion without being considered crazy.

Only a poet could listen to the inner voice of the unconscious wisdom, recognize her ignorance and feel how horrible it is to live in a place where everyone is crazy.

The cure of schizophrenia and psychosis is the total and absolute respect to the moral principles of goodness. A schizophrenic is someone who is completely dominated by the wild side of his or her conscience.

In case the patient is a murderer, one must learn how to forgive oneself, which is usually impossible to achieve since no one can forgive one’s own faults when they have caused despair and misery.

Schizophrenia is a very serious mental and psychic disease that cannot be cured because the wild side has completely dominated the human conscience. There is no human personality in the psychic sphere. This is why schizophrenics cannot recuperate their human conscience once they lose it.

However, they can learn the meaning of their actions and can regain their humanity if they are willing to endure suffering. Suffering is medicine when it gives the patient the necessary conditions that help one become sensitive.

In case schizophrenic patients are victims of other people’s cruelty, they must learn how to forgive their enemies, which is impossible because their enemies hurt them too much.

Schizophrenia is the result of human craziness, the massive craziness that governs our world, a world where terror, violence, immorality, hypocrisy, poverty and indifference coexist. This is the insane world of the crazy human being!

Psychosis is also the result of the same global insanity…

In fact, schizophrenic and psychotic patients are the biggest victims of violence and indifference.

However, they can regain their mental, psychological and emotional health through dream interpretation, even though the process is very difficult and time-consuming. Everything is difficult when we have to deal with diseases as terrible as schizophrenia and psychosis.

Time and many efforts are required, but the patients can be cured!

This is a miracle!

We can cure these horrible diseases and save the people who are affected by them today, but we must surely focus on craziness prevention from now on!

We must put an end to all the horrors of our lives, so that schizophrenia and psychosis ceases to exist in our population.

Massive psychotherapy is indispensable for humanity if we wish to save the human race and our own planet, since we have almost destroyed all the natural sources, and created an imbalance in the nature of Earth.

Unconditional and unrestricted peace, truth, wisdom, patience, piety and goodness are the cures for schizophrenia and psychosis.

Only when we become organized and everyone will be sensitive instead of being indifferent to the horrors they “don’t have the power to eliminate,” will humanity be characterized by psychological, mental and emotional health.

Prevent Depression and Craziness through the scientific method of Dream Interpretation discovered by Carl Jung and simplified by Christina Sponias, a writer who continued Jung’s research in the unknown region of the human psychic sphere.

Learn more at: www.booksirecommend.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christina_Sponias

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia – Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Methods

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | November 17th, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Juliet Cohen

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that has been recognized throughout recorded history. The first signs of schizophrenia typically emerge in the teenage years or early twenties. It is a form of psychosis, which is an impairment of thinking in which the interpretation of reality is abnormal. It is uncommon in children and is hard to recognize in its early phases. The term schizophrenia literally means split mind; however, many people still believe incorrectly that the condition causes a split personality (which is an uncommon problem involving dissociation). The cause of schizophrenia is still unclear. People with schizophrenia may hear voices other people don’t hear or they may believe that others are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. Certain psychotic disorders such as bipolar disorder in a manic phase and delusive disorder share some of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia but can have distinctly different courses and prognosis.

Schizophrenia can be caused by schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, drug abuse and other factors. It is not caused by childhood experiences, poor parenting or lack of willpower, nor are the symptoms identical for each person. The behavior of children with schizophrenia may change slowly over time. It affects approximately one percent of the world’s population, making it the most common psychosis. Schizophrenia and other mental health disorders have fairly strict criteria for diagnosis. Time of onset as well as length and characteristics of symptoms are all factors. Available treatments can relieve many of the disorder’s symptoms, but most people who have schizophrenia must cope with some residual symptoms as long as they live. A person with schizophrenia does not have a “split personality,” and almost all people with schizophrenia are not dangerous or violent towards others when they are receiving treatment.

Causes of Schizophrenia

The common causes and risk factor’s of Schizophrenia include the following:

The exect causes of schizophrenia are not known.

Genetic factors.

Chemical or subtle structural abnormalities in the brain.

Biological and environmental factors.

A Family history of Schizophrenia.

Psychological and social factors.

Symptoms of Schizophrenia

Some sign and symptoms related to Schizophrenia are as follows:

Loss of appetite.

The sense of being controlled by outside forces.

Delusions.

Incoherence (not understandable)

Regressive behavior.

Diminishment of the self.

Inability to take care of personal needs.

Violence.

Argumentativeness.

Lack of pleasure in everyday life.

Treatment of Schizophrenia

Here is list of the methods for treating Schizophrenia:

People who experience acute symptoms of schizophrenia may require intensive treatment including hospitalization.

Antipsychotic or neuroleptic medications (such as clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole) work by changing the balances of chemicals in the brain and are used to control the symptoms of the illness.

Supportive and problem-focused forms of psychotherapy may be helpful for many individuals.

If people with schizophrenia become depressed, it may be necessary to add an antidepressant to their drug regimen.

Individual therapy: Cognitive therapy involves a therapist helping you learn ways of coping with stressful thoughts and situations to reduce your risk of a relapse.

Patients who lack family and social support may be helped by intensive case management programs that emphasize active outreach and linkage to a range of community support services.

Juliet Cohen writes articles for diseases cure and health care information. She also writes articles on skin diseases.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Juliet_Cohen

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Battling SCHIZOPHRENIA

Schizophrenia’s Cure

Categories: SCHIZOPHRENIA | November 15th, 2007 | by HART 1-800-HART | no comments

By Christina Sponias

Of course you know that schizophrenia is a psychological disease that cannot be cured. However, since it was discovered that it is caused by the wild and primitive conscience inherent in the human psychic sphere, we can now eliminate its symptoms and completely cure the patients who suffer from schizophrenia if they agree to pass through the indispensable suffering for the recuperation of their sensibility.

The suffering is unbearable, but so are the symptoms of schizophrenia, especially hallucinations, emptiness in the mind, screeches in the ears, absurd and repetitive thoughts and unbearable sensations of complete loss of equilibrium.

If you are suffering from these symptoms, you require a lot of efforts to be cured; however, you can be cured if you stay strong and remember that you are fighting craziness.

Your resistance has to be very strong because all the symptoms you have are caused by your wild and evil conscience, which is very powerful and insistent. The symptoms of schizophrenia are in fact attacks of the evil anti-conscience that is destroying your human conscience completely and controlling your behaviour.

Since you are now aware that this evil side is attacking you, and you identify yourself with your human conscience that respects human values and moral rules, you have to fight against the monster that is destroying your human side, through your determination and strength.

That means that when you have hallucinations, you must patiently wait until they stop, without doing anything. You can perceive that you are being dominated by hallucinations because they simply cloud your eyes. You don’t close your eyes as when you sleep and dream, but you start seeing the fantasies that the evil anti-conscience projects when your eyes are wide open.

You can perceive the difference between these images and reality because the hallucinations have extravagant color and you play a passive role in the hallucinations. You observe several things that appear in front of your eyes, until you forget what you are doing.

Therefore, you must not look at these images and follow them. You must concentrate your mind in an object of your objective material life and look at it all the time, until the hallucinations stop. They stop at a certain point. If you are resistant and never follow them, they will disappear completely.

You must behave in the same way when you are dominated by any of the abovementioned symptoms.

These symptoms are indicative of the worst stage. Craziness is a process that starts from neurosis and hysteria, and ends up in psychosis and schizophrenia.

We better consider craziness in general rather than dividing it into multiple categories if we want to understand its mechanism, because it is exactly the same process, with several variations according to the level of domination of the anti-conscience in the human conscience.

You have an enemy you didn’t know: your own ancient conscience, that didn’t pass through the process of transformation that your human side has been through.

If you fight it, you are going to win for sure, because it is powerful only because it does not meet with any resistance to its attacks from the human conscience.

You have to be very strong and face everything with seriousness.

Dream interpretation can guide you through your psychotherapy, which however has to be based on your resistance. You must not follow the absurd thoughts and hallucinations; you must not do what your enemy wants you to. You have to beat the enemy for not allowing it to dominate you.

I recommend that you have somebody else’s help in dream interpretation and in the whole process of fighting against the domination of the anti-conscience. Later on you can continue alone, but right now you better have protection and company.

Never stay alone. You have to be always with at lest one person, but you better be always with many people.

Be part of groups; don’t stay isolated.

Other people will help you very much, but the most important is your own resistance against the attacks of the anti-conscience.

Through dream interpretation, you can learn how to be resistant and how to fight against craziness until you surely win this battle. Then you can completely recover your human conscience by recuperating your sensitivity if you eliminate your ego. The unconscious will give you directions in your dreams.

Prevent Depression and Craziness through the scientific method of Dream Interpretation discovered by Carl Jung and simplified by Christina Sponias, a writer who continued Jung’s research in the unknown region of the human psychic sphere.

Learn more at: www.booksirecommend.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christina_Sponias

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LAST FIVE POSTS

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: ADDICTION

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: ALHEIMER's DISEASE

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: CANCER

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: DEPRESSION

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: DIABETES

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: HEARING LOSS

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: HEART and STROKE

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: OBESITY

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: SCHIZOPHRENIA

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: STRESS

  • BATTLING THE MONSTER: VISION