Life as an adult with disability: results of the Easter Seals study



Walking, seeing, hearing, speaking. These are things we do every day without even thinking. These are things that we take for granted. But there are people out there for whom taking a short flight of stairs can be equivalent to climbing Mt Everest, for whom seeing a flower or hearing a bird song or reciting a nursery rhyme may be luxuries they’ll never enjoy. But even those whose disabilities allow them to walk, see, talk and hear may still have problems living a “normal” life as we know it. Education, employment, financial independence are just a few of the hurdles these people have to face. These are problems that do not only concern the people with disability themselves but their families as well. Parents are especially concerned what happens to their children when they reach adulthood, when the parents are not around to advocate for them.

This is where Easter Seals come in. Easter Seals is “a leading non-profit provider of services for individuals with autism, developmental disabilities, physical disabilities and other special needs.”

Easter Seals has conducted the Living with Disability study which compared the challenges facing adults with developmental disabilities and parents of adult children with disabilities, as compared to parents of adult children without disabilities. The study was conducted in August to September 2010 and surveyed 1,714 adults in 3 categories: 390 adults living with a developmental disability, 318 parents of adult children who have developmental disabilities, and 1,006 parents of adult children without disabilities.

Here are some of the key findings of the study:

The results of the study will be used to raise public awareness but also give insights to parents of children with disability on how to prepare for their offspring’s future.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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