How yoga helps prevent cancer



Once again, when the going gets really tough, we turn to age-old therapies. And most of them work, too. Take yoga, for example. The physical and mental benefits of yoga have been demonstrated time and again. According to a report in the November issue of Focused on Health, the web newsletter of the MD Anderson Cancer Center, yoga’s benefits include improving sleep, mood and quality of life – and cancer prevention.

Physical exercise and keeping a healthy weight helps prevent cancer, according American Institute for Cancer Research. For those whose body cannot withstand strenuous physical (e.g. cancer and surgical patients), yoga may be a more effective alternative. Yet, even those deemed to be healthy can benefit from yoga. Here are just a few benefits of yoga:

There is a misconception that practicing yoga is tantamount to being immobile or sedentary. A high-intensity yoga that keeps the heart pumping may actually be equivalent to the recommended 30-minute physical exercise. In fact, according to Carla Warneke, a yoga instructor for the Place of wellness at M. D. Anderson:

“All types of yoga can have benefits because they get you breathing deeply and get your body moving.”

You may ask. Which style of yoga is the best? According to Warneke, no one style is better than the other. What is important is that the yoga style fits the person. There are different yoga styles for every personality. One of the most popular branches of yoga is the hatha yoga which comes in several styles as described below:

Most of all, it is important to remember yoga is not a competitive sport. You can adjust your position according to your physical condition and limits. It’s not about winning. It’s about finding the balance.

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Comments

  1. Had to practice yoga after a back injury playing basketball. Together with accupunture they saved my back. Yoga is nothing but amazing.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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