Cancer in the headlines, June 4: breast cancer news



Peaches, plums induce deliciously promising death of breast cancer cells
What do peaches and plums have in common aside from being yummy? They are great as cancer cell fighters! Researchers at Texas AgriLife Research report that extracts from these two fruits make even the most aggressive breast cancer cells “keel over”. The anti-cancer powers of these two fruits are attributed to phenolic acids. More about these, next week.

Bone drug suppresses wandering tumor cells in breast cancer patients
Zoledronic acid (marketed as Zometa) is a drug prescribed to strengthen bones. But researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report that this drug can also be beneficial for patients with metastatic breast cancer. “When the drug was given along with chemotherapy for three months before breast cancer surgery, it reduced the number of women who had tumor cells in their bone marrow at the time of surgery.”

Olive-oil enriched diet helps breast cancer survivors lose more weight
Olive oil is well-known for being a heart-friendly oil. Miriam Hospital researchers report additional benefits of this oil – inducing weight loss in breast cancer survivors. Brest cancer patients are prescribed low-fat diet to control weight because weight increase in these patients elevates the chances of cancer recurrence. The researchers report that a diet rich in olive oil is more likely to help weight loss than the standard calorie-poor diet.

Breast cancer genes not worsened by lifestyle
So you have the genetic predisposition for it. Does lifestyle make a difference? Researchers at the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford say that lifestyle factors do not increase the risk for genetically-determined breast cancer. That doesn’t mean to say that you shouldn’t care about your lifestyle. Say lead author Ruth Travis:
There’s a danger of feeling you’re at the fate of your genes. But whatever you’re born with, there are things you can do to modify your risk.”
Unhealthy lifestyle may not elevate your risks but a healthy one might help lower them. Think about it.

UT Southwestern unveils next generation CT scanner that views whole organs in a heartbeat
After all the recent safety issues of CT scans, this new generation scanner launched recently at UT Southwestern Medical Center is very much welcome because it is fast. The new scanner allows “doctors to image an entire organ in less than a second or track blood flow through the brain or to a tumor – all with less radiation exposure to patients.” Radiation from CT scans are believed to increase cancer risk, including breast cancer in women.

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  1. This blog is very helpful for cancer patient.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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