Cancer in the headlines, May 21



Swim Across America for cancer
Swim Across America will be hosting two events to benefit the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. On July 16, 2010 is the Boston Harbor Island Swim. This 22-mile open-water relay features Olympians and local swimmers plunging into the Atlantic to make a difference for cancer survivors. This event kicks off with a party and silent auction and the swim starts at Rowe’s Wharf in Boston.

On July 17 is the Nantasket Swim. Swimmers age 12 and up are invited to join this fundraiser, which features a one-mile competitive swim and a half-mile recreational swim. Both events start at the Nantasket Beach House in Hull, Mass.

All proceeds support follow-up care and research for cancer survivors at Dana-Farber’s David B. Perini, Jr. Quality of Life Clinic.

Pink Ribbons on the Road: Texas Gets Breast Cancer License Plate
Starting this month, the state of Texas follows the example of other states and is offering specialty license plates with oink ribbons to help promote breast cancer awareness. Two different designs are available at $55 a year and 10% of the proceeds will be donated to National Breast Cancer Foundation. “The plates will be available for cars, motorcycles, trailers, RVs and buses. Personalization is also offered at an additional cost. The license plate will be available for pick up at the county tax assessor’s office about three weeks after the order is placed.”

Actress Lynn Redgrave Dies at 67 of Breast Cancer
Lynn Redgrave, actress and mother died of breast cancer earlier this month. According to her family, she “passed away peacefully after a seven year journey with breast cancer.”The 67-year old documented this journey in her autobiographical photographic journal “A Mother and Daughter’s Recovery from Breast Cancer”. After undergoing mastectomy and several types of therapies, Redgrave was declared cancer-free in 2003. However, the cancer came back and metastasized to other organs this year.

Cancer report energizes activists, not policy
What really causes cancer? Is it the carcinogens that are in the food and drinks we consume and in the air we breathe or is it our unhealthy lifestyle such as smoking and lack of physical activity? Experts are debating heated over this issue. A panel consisting of two cancer experts issued a report recommending drastic policy changes that would address the environmental causes of cancer. However, Dr. Graham Colditz of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis believes the report only distracts people from behavioral changes that can prevent cancer by giving them other scapegoats to blame. More about the debate in the next post.

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