Heart(y) news, March 26



Heart groups applaud passing of US health reform bill but say: Real work now begins
major medical groups in the US are applauding the passing of the health reform bill. The groups which included the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Physicians (ACP), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

According to AHA President, Dr Clyde Yancy (Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute, Dallas, Texas):

“…although not a perfect package, the proposed legislation is a true start to address the principles of the AHA and to achieve a goal of a healthier country with reduced suffering from heart diseases and strokes. The current system, if left unchanged, would have only deepened the divide between those with and those without access and would have led to even more suffering. But the real work of healthcare reform has just begun. The commitment of the AHA is to champion better health, promote more research, and drive best practices.”

However, experts believe that although this is a good start, the real work in refining the bill and it implementation is only beginning.

Mount Sinai researchers are the first to identify heart abnormalities in World Trade Center workers
Mount Sinai researchers recently announced the first results of the study “First Documentation of Cardiac Dysfunction Following Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster.” The study identified heart problems among 9/11 responders. More about this in next week’s post.

FDA Warns about Increased Risk of Muscle Injury with Zocor
Earlier this week, the U.S. FDA issued a warning about a possible side effect of the statin Zocor (simvastatin) at high doses. Patients and healthcare providers are warned that the risk for muscle injury is increased among those who take 80 mg Zocor to lower cholesterol levels. Muscle injury includes rhabdomyolysis which is the most serious form of myopathy and can lead to severe kidney damage, kidney failure, and sometimes death.

New guidelines aim to prevent unnecessary death from thoracic aortic disease
Thoracic aorta disease is a rare but deadly condition that kills approximately 10,000 Americans each year. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have recently issued new guidelines in the diagnosis and management of this rare disease to prevent unnecessary death.

Kansas Takes Step to Enact Indoor Smoking Restrictions
Starting July 1, the state of Kansas goes smoke-free indoors. A bill was signed by Kansas governor Mark Parkinson that will impose restrictions on smoking in restaurants, offices, and other public places. Kansas will be the 25th state to impose such restrictions.

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Print Friendly

Speak Your Mind

*


*

NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
Read previous post:
The Battling For Health Ballad (our new jingle)

Here is our new jingle, courtesy of LoveJingles.com ... This is a great story .. if you want your own...

Close