X’mas stress and depression: tips for prevention



`Tis the season to be jolly, tra la la la… But the holiday season can bring not only good mood and goodwill but stress and depression. The holiday season in the US starts can start as early as November at Thanksgiving until New Year. In Europe it starts from early December till 6 January, the feast of the 3 Kings. In an Asian country where I was born, Christmas starts when the month’s name ends with “-ber”, e.g. as early as September! It goes without saying that the holiday season can become too long and although many of us start off quite happy and gay, we get burned out towards the end of the season, what with too much shopping, too much cooking and baking, too much wining and dining, too much celebrating. It puts a burden on us financially, physically, as well as emotionally. It can cause strain in our personal relationships, our professional life, thereby tipping over that ever precarious life-work balance. It is no wonder that the holiday season can end in stress and depression. Fortunately, there are ways and means to prevent these. Health experts at the Mayo Clinic give us some good advice.

The first step is to recognize the most common holiday triggers that lead to a meltdown and immediately try to diffuse these triggers. The second step is to take control of the holidays and not let the holidays control you. The Mayo Clinic experts give us some 10 concrete steps to avoid stress and depression this holiday season

Photo credit: stock.xchng

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  1. Christmas starts when the month’s name ends with “-ber”, e.g. as early as September. this is the festival of joy and happiness. this make people crazy for shopping , cooking , baking and making some dishes to serve to their friends and family members. this article was written so enthusiastically and upto the meaning..

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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