Heart(y) News, November 6



worldnewsSome hearty news on this cold but sunny Friday morning…

Interventional cardiologist sues hospital under Whistleblower’s Act
A cardiologist blows the whistle on his clinic where he worked for 22 years after he was fired and files a suit under the Whistleblower Act. The litigant claims that his superiors at the cardiology department of Lahey Clinic in Burlington, MA acted unethically by actively promoting and even putting pressure on the doctors to use medical devices manufactured by Medtronic. He further claims that his bosses are being compensated by medical device firm.  This so-called “conflict of interest” is common in the health care industry but is considered unethical.

Doctors’ Deal with Coke Sparks Outrage
The alliance between American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and Coca-Cola sparked a controversy that lead to more than 20 doctors resigning from the group. Coca-Cola will fund educational materials on the academy’s site which will target soft drinks.
According to Dr. Walter Willett, a nutrition expert at Harvard University

“Coca-Cola, like other sodas, causes enormous suffering and premature death by increasing the risks of obesity, diabetes, heart attacks, gout and cavities.”

The CEO of AAFP, however, defended the project. The site, he said, will feature the link between soft drinks and health problems such as obesity. Coke won’t have any control or influence on the editorial content.

World’s 1st total artificial heart to dual heart & liver transplant performed at Cleveland Clinic
Cardiothoracic surgeons at Cleveland Clinic made history when they successfully performed a dual heart and liver transplant on a dentist. The 63-year old patient was on Total Artificial Heart for 113 days, a device that bridges the waiting time for a matching donor.  The surgery took 14 hours and involved two transplant teams. Total Artificial Heart is made by SynCardia.

AHA statement on FDA Front of Package Nutrition Label Letter to Industry
The American Heart Association (AHA) applauds the US FDA’s letter to the food industry on Front of Package Nutrition Label. According to a statement by Nancy Brown, AHA CEO:

“Nutrition symbols and other messaging on the front of food packaging can help consumers make informed choices about health and diet. But these health-related icons have proliferated in the marketplace over the last decade with numerous icon systems and more emerging—which can be confusing to consumers… We look forward to working with the FDA to optimize food labeling and better communicate this vital information to consumers.”

Photo credit: stock.xchng

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