What’s the latest in health care, June 5



What’s new in health care research?

Making Hospital Discharges Safer for Seniorsworld_stet2
This Healthcare 411 podcast at the site of U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) focuses on the welfare of elderly patients just returning from the hospitals. In many cases, these patients suffer from medications mishaps. The latest AHRQ data suggests that American hospitals spent nearly $31 billion on care that could have been prevented with more timely and effective outpatient treatment… new information technology system helps to make the transition from hospital to home safer.

New Reports Show Weak Progress on Health Quality
Good news and bad news about American health care. The good news: An AHRQ study reveals an improvement – albeit weak – in the overall health quality. The bad news: patient safety is getting worse. More details in another post!

Eating Disorder Hospitalizations Rising
The latest AHRQ figures on eating disorders show an 18% increase in hospitalizations due to eating disorders between 1999 and 2006.

What’s new in health care reform?

A Strategy for Health Care Reform – Toward a Value-Based System
Dr. Michael E. Porter of Harvard Business School gives his perspectives (published in the June issue of the New England Journal of Medicine) on how to go about reforming the US health care system. He proposes a series of critical steps, namely:

What’s new at the regulators?

FDA Awards $1 Million in Grants to Three States to Enhance Food and Feed Safety
The US FDA awarded onye-year grants to Arkansas, Nebraska, and Wisconsin Food Safety and Security Monitoring. The funds will be used to fund/set up Food Emergency Response Network (FERN) labs. FERN labs play an essential role in food safety monitoring, especially in large-scale events affecting food or food products.

FDA Forms Transparency Task Force
This task force has the job of developing recommendations that will enhance the transparency of the US FDA’s decision-making process, especially in drug approval. The agency has been criticizes before about conflicts of interest and political influences in their operations. According to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius “Our administration is committed to making government open and transparent. The Transparency Task Force will give the American people a seat at the table and make the FDA more open and accountable.”

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Comments

  1. Unfortunately our healthcare system is very poor and this is why there are a lot of people who loose their lives. An affordable healthcare insurance and some health education programs would be perfect for patients who are discharged from hospitals or from different rehabilitation centers. I am working at the California bay area drug rehab center and we’ve recently initiated a campaign to collect funds in order to help rehabilitated patients to continue their treatment after being discharged from hospital.

  2. This doesn’t happen just to elder people but also to patients from discharged from a methadone treatment center. The idea of making an affordable healthcare insurance is great. In this way everyone could take benefit of the healthcare assistance.

  3. Mike Johnson says:

    The FDA today proposed to amend its food labeling regulations to permit the egg industry to place the safe handling statement for shell eggs on the inside lid of egg cartons if the statement “Keep Refrigerated” appears on the top or side panel. This proposed rule applies to shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella bacteria that can cause food-borne illness. If the rule is finalized, consumers may see the safe handling statement every time they open the egg carton. Currently, the safe handling statement must appear on either the top or any side panel of egg cartons. I was reading up on masters in public health when I found out about this new rule and I couldn’t believe it.

  4. Thanks, man! Great article with very useful infomations.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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