Osteoarthritis in canines: biomarker research gives hope to dog owners



dogIt is not only humans who suffer from osteoarthritis. Animals such as horses and dogs can have it as well. Osteoarthritis is a disease characterized by degradation of the articular cartilage, that results in pain, inflammation and loss of motion in the joint.

And like humans, animals also suffer from pain and restricted mobility that the disease brings.

Researchers at the University of Missouri have been searching for a feasible biomarker for risk of developing osteoarthritis and they might just have found one that works for dogs as well. According to James Cook, professor of veterinary medicine and surgery, and the William & Kathryn Allen Distinguished Professor in Orthopedic Surgery

“By developing methods for earlier diagnosis of osteoarthritis, prevention or even curative treatment strategies to manage the disease become more realistic. Biomarkers could detect the disease before pain and swelling occurs, and owners could take preventative measures, such as modifying activities or diet, helping their pets lose weight and strengthen their joints, to reduce the likelihood of their dogs developing osteoarthritis.”

The researchers looked for potential biomarkers in the synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates the joints. It is believed that the synovial fluid responds rapidly to damage to the joints. The By taking samples from dogs, UM researchers found that the quantity and quality of synovial fluid exhibited some marked changes in canine patients with injured stifle joints. This is the joint in the hind limbs of dogs that is the equivalent joint to the human knee.

“At the MU Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, we are particularly interested in identification and validation of biomarkers that can detect early stages of osteoarthritis to provide accurate diagnostic and prognostic information prior to the onset of clinical disease for people and for pets,” Cook said. “Our team, led by Drs. Kuroki, Stoker and Garner, is making tremendous progress in developing simple tests on blood, urine and synovial fluid that show great promise for helping us diagnose impending osteoarthritis before it is too late to help the patient in the most effective manner.”

Like in humans, osteoarthritis in dogs is associated with age. It is estimated that 20% of middle-aged dogs and 90%of older dogs have osteoarthritis in one or more joints. In humans, the incidence is even much higher.

Photo credit: stock.xchng

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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