News from the cancer side, December 12



News from the global front

Cancer to be world’s top killer by 2010, WHO says
The latest report from the World Health Organization brings bad tidings. Global death rate due to cancer is on the rise. This year, the number of cancer cases is expected to reach 12 million and 7 million of these will result in death. By 2010, it will be the world’s leading cause of death. By 2030, the number of cases may be almost triple.

News from the cancer fighters

Cancer organizations team up for global cancer fight
In response to the WHO report, several cancer groups pledged to join forces with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to stop the rising incidence of cancer. The groups include American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Lance Armstrong Foundation and the National Cancer Institute of Mexico. “The American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Lance Armstrong Foundation also issued a 6-point call-to-action outlining steps the incoming US administration can take to ease the global cancer burden.

News on transplants

Older age doesn’t affect survival after bone marrow transplant
Success of bone marrow transplant is not dependent on age, according to this study by researchers at the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. “Age alone should not determine whether an older patient with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome receives a blood stem cell transplant from a matched donor.” Good tidings for aging patients!

News from clinical trials

Lymphoma drug could treat leukaemia patients too
The latest data on the lymphoma drug rituximab (MabThera) indicates that it is also effective against leukaemia in combination with standard chemotherapy treatments. In 2 clinical trials, the rituximab chemotherapy combination was shown to increase the likelihood of remission compared to chemotherapy only. Truly a message of hope for leukaemia patients.

News from the lab

Melanoma in mice casts doubt on scarcity of cancer stem cells
The findings of this study suggest that scientists should rethink about what they think they know about cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are thought to be rare “tumour cells that continually regenerates a cancer.” The study results indicate otherwise, with some serious implications on currently developed cancer treatments that target these supposedly rare tumor-seeding cells.

News from the regulators

FDA teams with webmd for new online consumer health information
The US FDA teams up with WebMD to make health information more accessible to the American consumers. The FDA utilizes WebMD’s large readership to reach out millions of people out there who search online for health information. “…32 percent of American consumers-70 million adults-conducted online health searches in 2007, compared with 16 percent in 2001.”

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Print Friendly

Speak Your Mind

*


*

NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
Read previous post:
Generic heart drugs as good as brand name drugs

More bad news for big pharma. And good news for patients. Generic drugs are just as good as brand-name drugs,...

Close