September is ….



September is

  • National Ovarian Cancer Month
  • Childhood Cancer Month
  • Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month
  • Prostate Cancer Awareness Week (Sept. 14-20)
  • Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month
  • Take a Loved One for a Check-up Day (Sept. 16)

This month we’ll take a closer look at these topics and where we’ve come in the cancer battle.

Did you know?

The American Cancer Soceity tracks cancer occurrence, including the number of deaths, cases, and how long people survive after diagnosis. ACS also tracks data regarding behaviors that influence the risk of developing cancer and the use of screening tests.

These statistics are available on the ACS site.

These are the same statistics that we quote here on Battling Cancer each time we discuss a facet of cancer.

So where are we in this war on cancer?

In 1971 American President Richard Nixon enacted the National Cancer Act and the War on Cancer began.

From the National Cancer Institute site:

In 1970, the American people made clear their desire for a cure for the second-leading cause of death in the United States. President Nixon responded during his January 1971 State of the Union address: “I will also ask for an appropriation of an extra $100 million to launch an intensive campaign to find a cure for cancer, and I will ask later for whatever additional funds can effectively be used. The time has come in America when the same kind of concentrated effort that split the atom and took man to the moon should be turned toward conquering this dread disease. Let us make a total national commitment to achieve this goal.”

The National Cancer Institute also tells us the following:

If current trends continue, cancer is expected to be the leading cause of death in the United States by the year 2010. One in five persons in the US will die from cancer. Every three minutes, two people in the US die from cancer.

This April, Opinion piece, Renewing the War on Cancer by Lance Armstrong in the Boston Globe, paints a picture of a battle that has come to a slow standstill.

Cancer will take nearly 600,000 American lives in 2008, and 1.4 million will get the dreaded diagnosis from their doctor. Deaths are shamefully high among minorities and the poor. They die because of lack of access to the most fundamental human necessity – healthcare. One of the leading cancer specialists in America, Dr. Harold Freeman, says there’s a disconnect between what we know and what we do. We know how to defeat the enemy. We just don’t do it.

It is time to energize and re-strategize our battle plan.

Battling Books:

The Secret History of the War on Cancer by by Devra Davis ( 2007)

The War on Cancer:An anatomy of failure, a blueprint for the future by Guy B. Faguet ( 2008)

war-on-cancer.jpg

Cancer-Gate: How to Win the Losing Cancer War by Samuel S. Epstein (2005)

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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