A Little Bit Longer



Being a teenager is tough enough–tryng to fit in, yet be an individual… A diagnosis of diabetes adds a whole new meaning to the words teenage angst.

When it comes to coping with a diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes, Nick Jonas understands first hand exactly how a teen’s life can be turned upside down.

A Little Bit Longer is the newly released hit song, written by 15 year-old, pop star Nick Jonas of the Jonas Brothers, about his own diabetic journey that began with his 2005 diagnosis of Type I Diabetes. In fact it was a blood sugar of over 700 that sent Nick to the emergency room and began his particular challenge of dealing with diabetes on a road tour.

A Little Bit Longer

Got the news today
But they said I had to stay
A little bit longer
And I’ll be fine
When I thought it’d all been done
When I thought it’d all been said
A little bit longer
And I’ll be fine

But you don’t know what you got
‘Till it’s gone
And you don’t know what it’s like
To feel so low
Everytime you smile or laugh you glow
You don’t even know
No no
You don’t even know

Check out the YouTube Video of the Jonas Brothers and a discussion of A Little Bit Longer.

You can see Nick on the cover of the July issue of Diabetes Forecast, the consumer publication of the American Diabetes Association. If you don’t subscribe (why don’t you?) then you can check out the highlights of the story here.

Attention fans of the band: Nick Jonas is also giving away concert tickets to lucky fans in every American Diabetes Association affiliate branch city in which the band performs. You can read about the winners of a recent Phoenix, Arizona concert, on Friday July 11th.

The concert schedule is available on www.myspace.com/jonasbrothers

For more info on the Jonas Brothers Band, visit their official website and btw, their new album

A Little Bit Longer, releases August 12.

Resources:

Information for young adults with diabetes:

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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