Diabetes News, Friday June 6, 2008



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What’s going on in the world of diabetes?

Perhaps the most exciting news comes out of M.D. Anderson regarding Metformin and cancer response. Metformin is the most common drug prescribed for Type 2 diabetes. It was observed that patients using Metformin had a lower cancer incidence. Findings are preliminary and M.D. Anderson will soon begin a clinical trial with Metformin and hormonal therapy studying metastatic breast cancer patients who are obese. Read the complete article at Science Daily.

ScienceDaily, June 4, 2008. Long Time Pestacide Exposure May Increase Risk of Diabetes. “Licensed pesticide applicators who used chlorinated pesticides on more than 100 days in their lifetime were at greater risk of diabetes, according to researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The associations between specific pesticides and incident diabetes ranged from a 20 percent to a 200 percent increase in risk, said the scientists with the NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Medical News Today. June 4, 2008. People With Diabetics Not Getting Retinal Screening. “Three quarters of a million people with diabetes in England are at risk of losing their sight because they are not being screened for diabetic retinopathy. ”


United Press International, May 29, 2008. Pink Bark Reduces Blood Sugar in Diabetics. “A study published in the June 3rd issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) found that diabetic patients benefited from a specially prepared high-flavonal cocoa drink improved their blood vessel function. The improvement went from severely impaired blood vessel function to normal.”

Best Syndication News, May 23, 2008. Diabetes: Blood Vessel Function Improved with Cocoa Flavanols. “Pycnogenol, an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of a French maritime pine tree, reduces blood sugar in type 2 diabetes patients, U.S. researchers say. ”

Battling Diabetes Books:

Diabetes, Special 2008 Issue (Single Issue Magazine) by the Editors of Diabetes Magazine (June 1, 2008)

Diabetes Cookbook, Special 2008 Issue (Single Issue Magazine) by the Editors of Diabetes Magazine (June 1, 2008)

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Comments

  1. Scientific studies had been conducted to prove that Metformin reduces the complications of diabetes such as heart and kidney diseases, as well as blindness. Metformin has been approved by the FDA since 1994. It’s been successful in lowering blood sugar levels without going about it excessively. If blood glucose level is overly reduced, this will lead to hypoglycemia – with common symptoms ranging from headache, mild confusion, dizziness, sweating, and abnormal behavior, to loss of consciousness, seizure, and coma.

    That’s why the side effects of taking Metformin can sometimes look similar to those found in hypoglycemia. This can happen for people who somehow developed an intolerance of taking it, causing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis.

    You must get emergency medical help if you find any of such symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting. This condition of lactic acidosis is likely to develop if you have congestive heart failure, impaired kidney, or liver functions.

    Reference:
    side effects of metformin

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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Friday Cancer News, June 6, 2008

Friday again. Perhaps the most exciting cancer news comes out of M.D. Anderson regarding Metformin and cancer response. Metformin is...

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