Breastfeeding and Rheumatoid Arthritis



I found a very interesting report today about the women who breastfed for more than a year reduce their risk of getting rheumatoid arthritis.

Such were the findings of a Swedish study, further saying that women who have kids but did not breast \fed have no protection against rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, characterized by inflammation of the lining — or synovium — of the joints. It can lead to long-term joint damage, resulting in chronic pain, loss of function and disability, according to the Arthritis Association.

There has been too many known benefits reported that women get from breastfeeding, but this is the very first i hear that links breastfeeding to rheumatoid arthritis.

The Malmo University Hospital study included 136 women with rheumatoid arthritis and 544 women without the disease. Women who breast-fed for 13 months or more were half as likely to get RA as those who never breast-fed. Women who had breast-fed for one to 12 months were 25 percent less likely to get the disease than those who never breast-fed.

Over the past 30 years, the number of women breast-feeding for more than six months has increased dramatically, the researchers noted. They said it’s difficult to say whether there’s a link between higher rates of breast-feeding and a corresponding decline in the number of women with rheumatoid arthritis.

Quite intersting eh? I guess all women reading this blog will agree with me. I too breastfed my son when he was born. But only for 5 months. Afterwhich, becasue of my job that has been interfering to our breastfeeding sessions, I have to wean him rather too early.

But I do not have rheumatoid arthritis, but osteoarthritis. Hmmm…I’m just a sole data to add to the above findings.

Anyways, if this is another reason why women should breastfeed their kids as long as recommended (2 years) , I really see nothing wrong with it. I believe, as a mother, that all moms should breastfeed if their bodies can support it. Nothing beats a mother’s milk for your baby.

In fact, more and more mothers these days are choosing to breastfeed their kids, now that the health benefits of breastfeeding are already known and are being campaigned about.

Over the past 30 years, the number of women breast-feeding for more than six months has increased dramatically, the researchers noted. They said it’s difficult to say whether there’s a link between higher rates of breast-feeding and a corresponding decline in the number of women with rheumatoid arthritis.

But then, they are really mothers out there who are not capable of breastfeeding, I don’t blame them either, just because the isn’t able.

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Comments

  1. Wow, this paragraph is nice, my younger sister is analyzing these kinds of things, so I am going to
    convey her.

  2. Hi there colleagues, how is all, and what you desire
    to say concerning this post, in my view its really amazing in favor of me.

  3. Hello,

    I believe this web application will be of interest to people with interest in more research about the benefits of breastfeeding and arthritis. You can use World Hall to suggest your own ideas about what should be done to promote an understanding of why breastfeeding correlates with decreased arthristis rates and add information about your own experiences.

    begin forwarded message:

    I want to tell you about a new web resource that can be of real service to the breastfeeding community and beyond. World Hall enables us to discuss policy issues, identify who can do something about them, propose actions and vote —- to have our voices heard by those in positions to implement change.

    This is a unique opportunity: World Hall is being launched in the breastfeeding community. Actions regarding ban the bags, breastfeeding in public, breastfeeding in the workplace, insurance coverage for lactation services and others are already posted on World Hall.

    World Hall is different than a breastfeeding listserv or blog. We will be joined in the conversation by activists in other areas allowing for cross conversation and voting, enriching all involved. Our active engagement in World Hall will raise the visibility of breastfeeding to all who are listening to and conversing on World Hall. World Hall is free and non-commercial. It was developed by students at the New England Complex Systems Institute (necsi.edu) with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC is a great example of a major player that is watching the system and paying attention to the actions proposed and discussed.

    Your active engagement in World Hall will help to raise the visibility of the issues we all work on every day. Please vote, add new actions, comments, and identify new issues and players. Share World Hall with others.

    The site is at:
    www.worldhall.org/breastfeeding

    I look forward to meeting you there.

    ——————————————
    Naomi Bar-Yam Ph.D.
    Executive Director
    Mothers’ Milk Bank of New England

    Naomi@milkbankne.org
    www.milkbankne.org
    ——————————————

    Regards,

    Nina
    worldhall@necsi.edu

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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