My February is Gone



Forgive me for (sort of) neglecting this blog recently. Last week was my craziest week, not to mention that February is my craziest month!

Anyways, this month (March), I will try hard to keep this at the top of my long list. 😉

Well, the only good thing for slacking on the job is that I have a lot lesser stress and thus, is good for my osteoarthritis. That doesn’t mean though that I didn’t think hard about arthritis in the past weeks. I always do!

The following are important stuff I found on arthritis as of recent days (please go beyond the highlighted titles as they’re really important):

Glucosamine Found of No Value for Early Hip Osteoarthritis

In one of the few controlled trials to look at the substance in patients with hip osteoarthritis, glucosamine sulfate did not relieve pain any better than placebo, according to Rianna Rozendaal, M.Sc., of the Erasmus Medical Center, and colleagues.

The substance also had no effect on function, Rozendaal and colleagues wrote in the Feb. 19 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Our Opinion: Arthritis relief most welcome

We salute Dr. Salvatore Albani and his colleagues for ongoing efforts to better treat rheumatoid arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the United States. Albani, director of the UA’s Arizona Arthritis Center, has discovered a computer-designed peptide that could reduce the harmful side effects and high costs of treatment for arthritis sufferers.

The therapy Albani is working on would redirect the body’s immune system to control rather than spur inflammation, joint swelling and pain. Rheumatic conditions including arthritis cost Arizona $2.3 billion in medical expenses and lost earnings in 2003, reports the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Washington, Feb 21 (ANI): Rheumatoid arthritis patients are twice as likely to suffer from depression, a new study has found.

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are twice as likely to suffer from depression, a new study has found.

However, the study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill also noted that these patients are not likely to tell their doctors about it.

One of the most common forms of chronic inflammatory arthritis is Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an unbearable disease known for its inflammation of joint tissues, functional disability, persistent pain, stiffness and fatigue.

Well, this is all for now. I hope you found the above information relevant. Enjoy your Monday, people! 😉

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Comments

  1. Gloria Gamat says:

    thanks mca! i will definitely link you here. 😉

  2. Sorry, I made a mistake in my homepage link above. This one will work. You know, in case you want to visit me at some point…:)

  3. This post is very informative. Thank you for posting it. I also have OA and recently started a blog. I had early onset (20s) OA, and have had knee replacement and considering more surgery right now. I have taken glucosamine because my options for treatment are very limited due to not being able to take any other arthritis meds. (aspirins, nsaids, or cox-2 inhibitors) due to ulcer disease. But, I didn’t really notice any sig. difference when I was taking it.

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