Princess Birthday Cake and Ice Cream



Birthday goodness denied

A friend of mine once lamented that she would be unable to make a traditional birthday cake for her diabetic daughter. This really made her feel down, because parents love giving their children the best that they can for their birthday. She was positive her daughter could not have a birthday cake at all.

Never fear, Julie is here! Ok, so I did not say that exactly, but close enough. I did a search for Angel Food Cake, grabbed a recipe and designed a cake any little girl would love. Do you all remember ‘doll’ cakes? A cake was the skirt for a Barbie or other Barbie-type doll? It takes a lot of icing, but even for a diabetic child, this can be managed with an Angel food or chiffon cake, and a little creativity.

The Recipe

*3/4 c. sifted flour
*1/2 c. sugar
*1/4 tsp. salt
*1/2 c. sugar
*1 1/2 tbsp. liquid sugar substitute(or ¼ cup powder sugar sub.)
*2 tblsp cocoa powder
*10 egg whites
*1 tsp. cream of tartar
*1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

Beat egg whites, salt, and cream of tartar until the mixture begins to form peaks. Beat in ½ of the sugar. Beat until stiff peaks form. Beat in vanilla, remaining sugar, sugar substitute. Very gently, fold in the flour a small amount at a time. When it is completely incorporated, spoon batter into an ungreased angel food cake pan.

Sprinkle the cocoa powder over the top of the batter, then swirl in with a butter knife. This will make very pretty chocolate swirls throughout the cake.

Frosting

2 pkgs. low-calorie whipped topping mix
1 pkg. instant pudding
Sugar substitute to equal 1/4 c. sugar
1 1/2 c. cold water
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
Food coloring

Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl, If you want to make several different colors, separate into small bowls. Add in drops of food coloring until your frosting is the desired color. Add the water slowly during the mixing to help you decide when the frosting the right consistency for your preference.

The How-To

After your cake is baked, you might have a perfect sized hole in the middle for the doll. If not, here is a simple tip to get her to fit just right. Take a thread and hold each end tight in your fingers, then ‘saw’ off portions of cake that rose over the top of the pan. This will allow the cake to sit level and give you extra cake to fill in the middle hole, giving the doll some stability. Put the doll right into this hole, then stuff some of that extra cake into the hole, just around her waist.

Trim the blunt edges of the cake to give the top a more rounded look. If you need, you can put this into the doll section, as well. If not, just snack on it. I won’t tell. If you used a mold that did not have a flat top, you’re ahead of us right now. Go sit in the corner until called. Thank you.

Ok, you can come back now. Begin frosting the cake at the doll’s waist. A piping bag can come in handy here, pipe the frosting into the hole and up the doll’s waist a bit. Then, radiate out from the doll in rings. You can use a spatula or continue piping. I have seen doll cakes with dresses made entirely with the star tip! Use your imagination. Perfection does not count nearly as much as the look on your little girl’s face when she see’s a doll cake made by mommy (or aunt, or sis, or grandma!).

If you are using several colors, don’t forget to add in little garnishes here and there. You can even ‘dress’ the doll with frosting. And with this low-sugar frosting, you won’t feel guilty one bit.

Remember!

Even though this cake and frosting is low sugar, the recipe does contain sugar. You should check your child’s blood glucose levels before and after eating to ensure their birthday fun is, well, fun. Serve low/no sugar drinks, main course, and snacks to go with the cake. I found a great sugar free home-made ice cream recipe that would go great with a little girl’s party. It’s pink! (strawberry)

Home Made No Sugar Strawberry Icecream

*3 cups nonfat dry milk powder
*6 tablespoons butter, melted
*1 cup boiling water
*24 packages Sweet ‘n Low sweetener, or Equal
*1 small pkg sugar free vanilla pudding mix
*4 cans sugar-free strawberry soft drink
*16 ounces frozen strawberries, sliced*
*3 cups skim milk, (or 4 cups)

Mix all ingredients in a bowl, pour slowly into your ice cream maker to the ‘fill’ line. Follow manufacturer’s directions to freeze the ice cream.

Other Guests

If your other guests are coming to your child’s party, then they are probably already aware that your child is diabetic. The above recipes may not taste the same as traditional, but they should be pretty enough to satisfy any little girl. If you take a moment to register for the contest for the copy of The Big Book of Diabetic Desserts we’re giving away, you can find a lot of other cakes and treats you can offer your little one. No one, not even you, will belive that the desserts you make are low in sugar and diabetic safe. So safe, the book is endorsed by the American Diabetes Association!
Pretty cool, huh? A whole book full of super tasty treats you can bake for your child and not have to feel a bit guilty over.

Ok, Where Is The Boy Cake?

Hey, I’m working on it! I have a little boy, only 18 months old, so I am still learning about all the stuff little boys love. We have a construction cake for him, so I’m thinking of offering a Dirty Boy Birthday. No, don’t look at your husband, I am not offering AXE Bodywash or anything like that.

I think dirt cups are great, but they’re packed with sugar. So how about I experiment with some low-sugar dirt cups just for your little boy? Coming up soon!

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Comments

  1. Thanks Lisa and Marye. I had a doll cake when I was 4 or 5 and I never forgot it. Maybe I should post some picture of me with it if I can find them!

    Lisa, when is three feet of fun’s birthday? I’ll try to get those dirt cups up ASAP!

  2. You are so creative. Those doll cakes are adorable, too.

  3. I love the idea of a doll cake.. I have a boy. So I’m definitely interested in the dirt cups.. 😀 Awesome job.

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