Oatmeal Breakfast Bars



I created the following recipe as a low fat, energy packed breakfast for my family.You can modify it by adding in other chunks of fruit or nuts. It really is very versatile. If you would like, try using a 50-50 ratio of white and wheat flour. If you use wheat, be sure to use molasses. I have also used soy flour to add a protein punch. Enjoy!

Oatmeal-Fruit Breakfast Fuel

*2 cups Oat meal, plain (the kind in the big cylinder)
*¾ cup flour (all purpose)
*1 ½ cup low fat granola (I just used some from a cereal box with almonds and raisins)
*½ cup raisins
*2 bananas, sliced thin
*2 eggs
*1 cup milk (more or less)
* 1/2 cup honey or molasses

Preheat oven to 400 F.
Mix everything in a large bowl. It will be slightly ‘goopy’. The milk will not completely absorb, but try to get all of the flour mixed into the liquid. If the mix is too dry, add a little more milk. Once it is all completely mixed, pour into a pan that has been lined or oiled well.

Bake for 25-30 minutes. Check at 20 minutes for browning. The top of the bars should be dry with spotty golden brown areas. Remove from oven, cool until you can cut and handle the bars without being burned. Serve warm!

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Comments

  1. Otameal is very useful in weight reducing and help to fite with diabeties.

  2. All ingredients raise blood sugar except for the eggs.

    My blog is in swedish. Welcome anyway!

  3. Thanks for the link, good information there. I love finding new blogs to read!

    You can use the wheat, but need to make sure to add molasses. It is a really fun recipe to play with. Kids love it.

  4. Sounds good. I assume you used regular white flour. If you change the recipe and use King Arthur’s Whole Wheat White flour I bet it will taste just as good, with less carbs and more fiber because of the flour. Food labels for both flours are on my blog at: www.bernardfarrell.com/blog/2007/10/pastry-day.html

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