I Have Cancer, and This is What I Want You to Know, pt. 3



Recently, I have spent most of my day in intimate contact with a number of newly diagnosed cancer patients and their families. I’ve written this guide specifically from the view of the recently diagnosed for their friends, family and acquaintances of people with cancer. This is the third installment of the series — you can read part one here and part two here

The side effects are driving me crazy. Here’s an interesting tidbit: the treatments that I’m getting leave me with a weird taste in my mouth. Sometimes I just don’t feel like eating because of it. Also, during the days I have treatment, I might feel woozy and nauseous.

Please understand that it’s a very difficult thing to suddenly have to give up control of your body, and often times I am frustrated by my physical limitations. There are some days that just zap all my energy and it can take all of my strength to keep up with my daily activities. Sometimes I forget that this can be equally frustrating for you, too, especially if you’ve been trying to cheer me up by trying to take me out somewhere. Try this first: call, even if you’re not a big fan of using a phone. Come over and visit. I still want to you to be part of my life, we just need to work together and adjust.

Speaking of that, you should probably know that the things we used to talk about might not seem that important to me right now. I know, that seems contradictory to the idea of leading a normal life. It’s just that the kind of things that used to get us all worked up — the personality quirks about your significant other, the office gossip — might not seem as life-changing to me as it did before. I appreciate the effort that you’re making to help me go on with life as usual. It’s just that no one ever tells you that cancer can change your personality, too.

Don’t miss the next installment of the four-part series, “I Have Cancer, and This is What I Want You to Know.” Subscribe to our feed!

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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