I Have Cancer, and This is What I Want You to Know – Pt. 2



This is the second installment of a continuing series for friends, family and acquaintances of people with cancer. You can read part one here.

 

Daily chores may be difficult for me. Treatments can leave me tired and groggy. I can be in a lot of pain. I’ve got a million things on my mind. Chemotherapy, pain medication and anesthesia can leave me in a drug-induced haze. But the world doesn’t revolve around me and my needs — do you want to help? Offer to clean my house. Pick up my kid from piano lessons. Grab some stamps for me at the post office. Sometimes I’ll ask you, and sometimes I won’t because I don’t want to impose. I would really appreciate it.

Just because I’m not in the hospital doesn’t mean that I’m not getting treatment. If I’m taking my chemotherapy or radiation treatment in an outpatient procedure, I can be visiting a clinic almost every day. This isn’t too bad if I’m being treated at a local cancer center — I can drive myself or find someone who can take me if I’m unable to provide my own transportation. But if I’m receiving treatment at a specialized cancer center, I might have to take up residence somewhere somewhere else, even out of state!

I may have difficulty holding down a traditional 9-to-5. My workplace might not allow me to take more than a few weeks of medical leave. Sometimes I might not even be in the right frame of mind to be a good employee. This can be difficult for me not just financially but emotionally.

As you can see, there’s a lot on my mind. But even though I may not be ready to share these feelings with you right now, I would really appreciate if you would be there when I am.

Don’t miss the next installment of the four-part series, “I Have Cancer, and This is What I Want You to Know.” Subscribe to our feed! 

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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