Coping With A Diagnosis



A great blog post.

Sometimes people with diabetes forget that they are a person, not just a person with diabetes. I found a wonderful blog entry by Eric Lagergren in the Diabetes Self Management Blog.

Eric describes the hierarchy of his needs and how diabetes has affected his thinking, not just his life. It was an interesting post, complete with thoughts on how other veteran diabetics percive his writing and attitude towards his condition.

How do you see yourself?

Each day you deal with diabetes. Changing your diet, taking medication, visiting doctors and dieticians. It probably impacts how you spend your social life. Taking stock of your supplies, deciding if you have enough glucose tablets or insulin to take with you on a trip to watching your activities and blood sugar while at a social function.

Diabetes can consume you. It can drive all thoughts out of your mind except for the diabetes itself.

You can take your life back

You are a diabetic, but you are still you. The person you were before you were diagnosed with diabetes is still there. The diagnosis did not take away any of your talents or skills. All it did was add a new dimension to your life. A dimesion filled with not only medications, but a healthier way of living.

Once you are diagnosed, you begin (or should) to be more careful of how you treat your body. This is not any different from how all people should be. Eating better, exercising, and taking careful stock of your body. One diabetic once said, “I am healthier now as a diabetic than I ever was before.”

This is the goal of living well with diabetes. Some problems due to diabetes can be reversed with a good diet and lifestyle, so what do you have to lose? Nothing but pounds, inches, and possibly the most sever complications of the condition. Focus on the good aspects of being diabetic, not the negative.

You will always be the same person, no diagnosis will change that.

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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