Clinical Trial Now Enrolling Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients



Several sites are recruiting cancer patients for a study entitled, “Stress Management Therapy in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Cancer.”

 

The study’s aims are two-fold:

  1. Determine if a self-administered stress management intervention is effective in improving quality of life and decreasing psychological distress (anxiety and depression) in Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients receiving cancer chemotherapy
  2. Determine if the degree of acculturation in Hispanics influences the observed helpfulness of the intervention.

    Prospective cancer clinical trial enrollees must meet the following requirements:

    • Be newly diagnosed with cancer
    • Require a scheduled treatment regiment of more than four courses of intravenous chemotherapy
    • Not be scheduled for any radiotherapy treatment prior to the end of the fourth course
    • Not be diagnosed with severe depression or any other severe psychiatric disorders

    The clinical trial sites include:

    • California: Oakland
    • District of Columbia
    • Louisiana: Mamoy, Monroe, Shreveport
    • Michigan: Royal Oak, Troy
    • Minnesota: Bemidi, Springfield
    • New Jersey: Newark
    • New York: Bronx, White Plains
    • North Carolina: Cary, Goldsboro, Henderson, Highpoint, Statesville, Wilson, Winston-Salem
    • North Dakota: Fargo
    • Ohio: Chillicothe, Columbus, Delaware, Marietta, Newark, Springfield, Zanesville
    • Texas: Temple
    • Washington: Pullayup, Tacoma
       

      See the National Cancer Institute website for details on how to enroll.

    Related Posts with Thumbnails
    Print Friendly

    Speak Your Mind

    *


    *

    NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
    Read previous post:
    Fighting Alzheimer’s with water

    Alzheimer's is a disease of fragility. A mind can handle all sorts of problems, but when the brain has too...

    Close