My Personal Tips For People With Arthritis When Traveling



First of all, do not let your arthritis tie you down at home. There must ways when you can travel too, visit friends and enjoy what other places has to offer.

As you know, I went out of town with 5-year old son and my 59-year old mother. Thank God my mother has no any kind of rheumatoid condition and my son is such a sport he is his unusually-behaved self when traveling.

For someone like me whose knees buckle from time to time because of osteoarthritis, here are a few tips I’ve learned that I would like to share with you:

  1. Bring another adult with you, especially if you are traveling with a child. Bring somebody you can pull you up if your knees buckle and find yourself on a heap on the floor. Or someone who can carry you halfway when going up stairs. Bring a friend, a spouse or boyfriend, a brother or sister or, like in my case, my mother. Which means that you have to save additional travel money for that extra someone who will accompany you. May not be a problem for those who have husbands who most probably will shoulder the whole travel. But for single moms who shoulder everything, this is quite a feat, therefore travel should be planned up ahead so you can save up first before the big day — which by the way is what I do, thus there is no ‘going at the drop of the hat’ for me. Unless somebody else pays for our airfare. 😉
  2. Choose a mode of transportation that will be of most comfort to you. Like taking the plane over a car or a bus. Like the train, where you can stretch your legs on-board. We all flew going there and took the bus coming home. The bus wasn’t such a good idea but we took it for an entirely different reason. If there was a decent train going back, we would have taken that. At least you can walk on the halls of train better that on a bus. After all, your convenience at all times should come first, right?
  3. Don’t forget your meds. This is very, very important for obvious reasons. It is better to have your meds handy than searching for the nearest drugstore in an unfamiliar place. Besides, have your meds ready before going for unnecessary purchases when traveling, especially if you are on a budget. Am I right or am I right? 😀
  4. When you are meeting or dining out with your friends, choose activities or venues where you can stand up and sit down on short intervals. Tell your friends about your condition. My problem will attack if I’ve been inactive for a while. I’ll have problems getting up — it’s when my joints become sort of frozen and will buckle instead if I try to bend it. I can stand up for long hours either, my legs will “cramp” and that’s not good either. That’s why the type of activities and the venue are very important. While chatting with friends take endless hours, stand up from time to time.
  5. Even when not traveling, AVOID the stairs. Take the elevator or the escalator instead. Otherwise, be real careful and do not be ashamed to tell that you can’t take the stairs. The worst thing you can do is for you knees and legs what it cannot do.
  6. If like me, your legs got used to being massaged at the end of the day, when you are in a different place, check out the local salon or spa, to help you out. This is something I didn’t have the budget for forgot last weekend, thereby my condition sort of attacked. And since we are out daily the whole time we were there, my legs were sort of stressed out at the end of each day. My poor legs and knees!

Did I forget anything else?The above tips are from my personal experience, so the whole thing may not be applicable to you, as each case is unique. But then somebody else may be able to relate to all of the above.

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Comments

  1. Great tips. I will definitely advice my friend next time!

    Cheers
    Live My Life Online

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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