Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) Against Osteoarthritis



Researchers at the University of California – San Diego (UCSD) have associated the ingredient methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) in protecting articular cartilage and reducing inflammation in osteoarthritis.

Such findings provide additional evidence that MSM is beneficial to joint health.

Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate have been the most high profile joint health supplement ingredients to date, with MSM following in third place.

With a larger proportion of the American population aging than before, supplements focusing on joint health will likely continue to grow in popularity, especially if they can be scientifically proven to be effective.

Market researchers have time and again revealed baby boomers as a key demographic for supplement formulators and marketers as this generation is not only going to face more and more health problems as it approaches old age, but it also tends to have a greater sense of wanting to take charge of its own health, and in addition has the disposable income to do so.

The in vitro study investigated the effect of the MSM on healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilage from post mortem human knees.

The researchers focused on cytokines – genes that are markers of inflammation and are related to cartilage degradation.

They say the study results point to a protective effect of MSM on reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

The said findings were presented at the recent 2007 World Congress on Osteoarthritis in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and will appear soon in the Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Journal.

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a dietary supplement good for arthritis whose general recommended dosage is 1,500 to 6,000 mg per day.

The form of MSM used in the above study was Bergstrom Nutrition‘s OptiMSM®.

Source: NutraIngredients

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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