Beach Therapy For Arthritic Pain?



Where I am, in 20 minutes we’ll be at the beach. But then for some reason, I do not go there as often as one would think. My lack of own car is not an excuse, around here public transpos such as the jeepneys and tricylcles are very handy and cheap.

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[In Photo: my almost 5-year-old son, at the beach, April 29, 2007]

This year alone, I’ve just been to the beach twice: in April when a couple of my oldest friends came to visit and then this morning (6 am, GMT+8) because I was told that walking along the beach at early morning and burying yourself in the sand for a while (15-10 mins) is good for alleviating joint or arthritic pain.

Getting up that early is a feat for a night owl like me. However, going to beach this morning and burying myself in the warm sand was indeed therapeutic. And for better results, i should go there daily. Maybe I should. Nothing beats a dip in the ocean, and around here, the sea water is most often warm.

On top of the regular reflexology i am getting! Believe me I’d do anything just to reduce the amount of medicines i need to take everyday.

I’m not sure if there is a scientific explanation for beach therapy against arthritis pain, but according to a local old wives’ tale, it does work.

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But anyway, just think of the exercise (not to mention fun!) that you’ll get at the beach, and the early morning sunshine — if it is good for your bones, it will be good for your joints.

Remember, that exercise is critical in the treatment of arthritis — mobility without hurting the joints, that is.

And that water is the best place for people with arthritis to exercise.

So, if the beach is accessible to you, make sure to go there regularly. If not for a swim, then for a walk on the shore or for burying yourself in the sun. Even if you do not have arthritis, you will benefit from stretching your legs or for sweating under the sun.

Just make sure that you go there early in the morning to avoid the harmful rays of the sun. 6-7 am is still very good, warm enough but not scorchingly hot on the beach.

Enough blabber, I should go back tomorrow, and the next day, and the next.

What about you? Do you benefit from going to the beach regularly?

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Comments

  1. Risa Sanders says:

    This is a great post! I am working in the medical answering service and I am aware of how important is the sea and beach in order to diminuish arthritis pains.I am suffering of arthritis and I am going every year to the sea.I have to admit that burying in sand and walking on the beach every morning is the best therapy for calming pains.

  2. I was thinking to look for some cheap hotels and spend a month anywhere around a warm, sunny beach. My doctor told me that it would really help with my arthritic pain. Thank you for the extra information. Quite helpful, I might say.

  3. Andrea baltag says:

    I think that beach therapy cures almost everything, from love pain to depression and breathing problems. I one spend two month at Apogee condo South Beach and everything got better to me.I lost weight, my skin was glowing and i felt generally happier than i was in the city.I think i’ll buy a vacation home near the sea next time.

  4. I agree that water is the best place for people with arthritis to exercise. Just like swimming, all movements in the water will have minimum impact on the bones and thus less pain…

  5. yeah it does. i definitely felt a lot better this week. 30 minutes (or more) under the warm sand works wonders. i am definitely going to make it a regular habit. at least on weekends, that’s my only free time.

    reflexologists believe that the sand absorbs pain. wouldn’t hurt to try, don’t you think?

  6. Name withheld says:

    I am curious. Does the sand therapy work? I have a friend who suffers from arthritis and would like to know.

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