Food That Lowers Bad Cholesterol – Oats



By Stewart Hare

In this food that lowers bad cholesterol article about oats, you will discover:

* What are oats?
* Why are oats an important food that lowers bad cholesterol?
* How much oats do you need to eat to lowers bad cholesterol?

What Are Oats?

Oats are a type of cereal grain which is typically consumed as porridge.

The soluble fibre content of oats makes them a good mild laxative.

Oats have antioxidant properties and help to stimulate the digestion system.

The beneficial nutrients within oats are:

* Calcium
* Folic Acid
* Iron
* Magnesium
* Manganese
* Phosphorus
* Potassium
* Silicon
* Vitamin B5

Why Are Oats An Important Food That Lowers Bad Cholesterol?

Oats are an important food that lowers bad cholesterol, because it contains the soluble fibre – beta-glucan.

Studies have shown that by eating a couple of bowls of porridge per day, you can reduce your total blood cholesterol levels significantly.

The soluble fibre within oats helps to slow down the passage of food through your digestive system.

This makes it easier for your body to manage and absorb cholesterol.

How Much Oats Do You Need To Eat To Lowers Bad Cholesterol?

To help to lower your bad cholesterol levels within your body, you will need to eat about 3g of oats per day.

That’s about a couple of bowls of porridge per day.

Studies have shown that by eating this amount of oats, you can lower your cholesterol levels by up to twenty five per cent.

So, to sum up…

Oats are a good food that lowers bad cholesterol.

Studies have shown that you can lower your bad cholesterol levels significantly by just eating a couple of bowls of porridge per day.

Stewart Hare C.H.Ed Dip NutTh

Download ‘How To Beat Cholesterol Naturally’ Free E-book

Website: NewBeingNutrition.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stewart_Hare

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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