Hypnosis Ideas for Visualization After a Stroke



By Seth-Deborah Roth

When a stroke strikes a person, the supply of blood to the part of the brain affected is interrupted, starving it of oxygen. Brain cells can be seriously damaged or die, impairing local brain function.

Within weeks of a stroke, new blood vessels begin to form, (one can visualize marching ants), newly born neurons migrate long distances to the damaged area to aid the regeneration process. We don’t know what the right cellular environment is, and what the cellular cues are for this process of regeneration and migration to take place.

In the Journal of Neuroscience, S. Thomas Carmichael, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor at the UCLA Geffen School of Medicine, reports that in the mouse model, this march of the neurons is the result of signaling from the newly blooming blood vessels, which links angiogenesis (the development of new blood vessels) and neurogenesis, (the birth of new neurons). They have identified what these molecular signals are! Hopefully, this is the beginning.

Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability. Much is known about the mechanisms of cell death in stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms of recovery after a stroke.

Research has revealed that in the adult brain, new neurons form in a region of the forebrain known as the subventricular zone (SVZ). In mice, after a stroke was initiated in a part of the brain, located far from the SVZ, the researchers,tracked newly formed neuroblasts (which are immature brain cells from which mature adult neurons form) as they traveled through healthy brain tissue to the stroke area. These immature neurons wrapped themselves around the immature vascular cells that were in the process of forming new blood vessels in the damaged area. The neurons were found to arrive at the site within the first two to four weeks after the stroke.

Researchers found that two proteins, stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF1) and angiopoietin 1 (Ang1), that are given off by these newly-forming blood vessels, are what trigger the thousands of immature neurons to the site of damage.

The SDF1 and Ang1 proteins are what link the two processes of neurogenesis and angiogenesis together by promoting post-stroke neuroblast migration. These two proteins, also appear to effect behavioral recovery as well. The researchers produced the stroke in an area of the brain that controls the mouse’s facial whiskers. When the mouse was infused by the researchers with Ang1 and SDF1, improvement in the function of the whisker’s was seen to the same levels as the control (non-stroke) mice.

I would suggest that possibly, one might consider using these biological facts as images to include when using guided imagery hypnosis for stroke clients. Our thoughts are known to produce chemicals in our bodies. Perhaps, with our thoughts about the mechanisms that should take place we can stimulate that very mechanism.

Seth-Deborah Roth combines over 30 years of medical knowledge as a registered nurse and nurse anesthetist with her knowledge of hypnosis. Seth-Deborah is a Certified Instructor and faculty member of the National Guild of Hypnosis.

She is also a member of the National Board of Certified Clinical Hypnotherapists, the International Hypnosis Federation, the American Board of Hypnosis and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. She is an instructor in Medical Hypnosis at the “Hypnotherapy Center” in Oakland California. She received the 2005 “Award of Excellence” in the category of Health Care from the International Hypnosis Federation (IHF). She has been featured on the Discovery Channel’s “Myth Busters” segment on hypnosis.

She has also written a book entitled “Medical Hypnosis – An Essential Guide” Hypnotherapy for Health (510) 690-0699 www.hypnotherapyforhealth.com read my blog site www.hypnotichealth.blogspot.com Order “Diet Is a Four Letter Word” cd

Article Source: EzineArticles.com/?expert=Seth-Deborah_Roth

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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