Foods that Help Relieve Anxiety, Panic and Depression Symptoms



Foods that Help Relieve Anxiety, Panic and Depression Symptoms

By Karla Jones

Did you know that by making some modifications to your diet, you could alleviate many symptoms related to anxiety, panic and depression? Take a look at some simple ways to use your diet to improve your mental health today.

The B Vitamin Group

This group of vitamins can contribute significantly to your overall mental and physical health. Specifically, the following vitamins from the B group can help:

Niacin (B3) – Niacin is a very important vitamin for energy production. Two unique forms of vitamin B3 are required for the body to convert proteins, fats, and carbohydrates into usable energy. Niacin is also used to synthesize starch that can be stored in the body’s muscles and liver for eventual use as an energy source. Deficiencies in vitamin B3 are thought to be linked to depression and anxiety, as B3 helps to support the neurotransmission system of the brain. For this same reason, adequate levels of Niacin are also thought to help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Foods rich in Niacin include chicken, tuna, salmon and mushrooms.

Thiamin (B1) – Thiamin rich foods help your body by providing energy, coordinating the activity of nerves and muscles and supporting proper heart function. Low levels of thiamin in the body can cause restless nerves and irritability, like that seen by patients suffering from panic and anxiety disorders. While it is not believed that a lack of thiamin actually causes these disorders, recommended levels of thiamin in the body can help improve how a person with panic or anxiety disorder feels.

Foods rich in thiamin include tuna, sunflower seeds, black beans, and yellow corn.

Vitamin B6 – B6 is one of the best vitamins for supporting the nervous system, so it can help support the body in warding off all sorts of feelings like sadness, depression, anxiety and panic. It is also helpful in the breakdown of sugars and starches in the blood, supporting proper insulin function, which helps provide energy and prevent fatigue.

Foods rich in Vitamin B6 include bell peppers, spinach, bananas and tuna.

Vitamin B12 – Vitamin B12 is a critical nutrient in supporting the production of red blood cells, preventing anemia. In addition, it promotes proper development of nerve cells and helps your cells metabolize protein, carbohydrate and fat. Clinical depression and memory loss can sometimes be linked to a Vitamin B12 deficiency. In addition, heart palpitations and fatigue, just as often seen in anxiety patients, are side effects of being deficient in B12.

Foods rich in B12 include baked snapper, venison, scallops and yogurt.

In addition to these B vitamins, it is recommended that you ensure that your levels of Biotin, Folic Acid, Riboflavin, and Pantothenic acid, all B vitamin derivatives, is adequate, to support overall physical and mental health.

Foods such as Calf’s liver, beans and sunflower seeds are all good choices to provide a wide variety of B vitamins.

Is that All You Can Do?

Making sure you eat all these foods rich in the B vitamins is not all you can do. There are two important natural substances found in certain foods that can help you boost your mood while relaxing your nerves and muscles – inducing a peaceful sleep. Visit the following site to learn about these key foods you don’t want to miss and start feeling better today, www.feelyourselfagain.com/foods_that_help_anxiety_panic.html

Article written by Karla Jones. For more information on key foods for anxiety, panic and depression visit: www.feelyourselfagain.com/foods_that_help_anxiety_panic.html

To learn more about anxiety and depression as well as treatment options visit: www.feelyourselfagain.com

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NOTE: The contents in this blog are for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or a substitute for professional care. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before making changes to any existing treatment or program. Some of the information presented in this blog may already be out of date.
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